• DTS.USA
    5.765
    -0.008
    -0.1%
  • NTI.USA
    2.910
    0.000
    0%
  • NTID.USA
    2.900
    -0.090
    -3%
  • NTIDL.USA
    2.010
    -0.090
    -4.3%
  • OTRI.USA
    7.190
    -0.220
    -3%
  • OTVI.USA
    11,406.010
    -45.940
    -0.4%
  • DTS.USA
    5.765
    -0.008
    -0.1%
  • NTI.USA
    2.910
    0.000
    0%
  • NTID.USA
    2.900
    -0.090
    -3%
  • NTIDL.USA
    2.010
    -0.090
    -4.3%
  • OTRI.USA
    7.190
    -0.220
    -3%
  • OTVI.USA
    11,406.010
    -45.940
    -0.4%
Modern ShipperNewsTop StoriesWarehouse

Big-box warehouse lease activity sets record in 2021

Companies sign 57 leases for 1 million square feet or more, CBRE says

It was another big year for the big box.

Companies signed a record 57 U.S. warehouse leases of 1 million or more square feet in 2021, up 19% from 2020 levels, according to data published Thursday by real estate services firm CBRE Group Inc. (NYSE: CBRE). Of the 100 largest manufacturing and logistics leases — which include the 57 megaleases — the average transaction size grew slightly to 1.05 million square feet from just under 1.04 million square feet. CBRE tracks manufacturing and logistics activity in its industrial property work, though the majority of transactions are in the logistics space.

Chicago, which had the strongest year of industrial activity in its history, led all markets with 12 transactions totaling 12 million. That was followed by the Interstate 78 and Interstate 81 corridor in Pennsylvania with 11, California’s Inland Empire complex with 10, and Dallas/Fort Worth with nine.

The Greenville-Spartanburg, South Carolina, market made it into the top 10 for the first time with three of the top 100 transactions, according to CBRE data. Classified by the firm as an “emerging growth” market, Greenville-Spartanburg has become an attractive location for industrial activity because of its relative affordability, temperate climate, pro-business policies and a growing population as Americans with newfound work-from-home flexibility flee larger and more expensive metro areas.

Megadeals in markets like Greenville-Spartanburg will become more commonplace as core industrial markets like New York-New Jersey, Los Angeles, Atlanta and the Baltimore-Washington corridor become more space-constrained and costly to occupy. John Morris, who leads CBRE’s Americas Industrial and Logistics business, said that the market has “just enough product” to meet current demand, but that megaprojects are “becoming fewer and far between” due to surging demand, labor shortages and, in certain markets, not enough land.

The “general retail and wholesale” sector, comprising occupiers with online and brick-and-mortar presences, accounted for 44 of the 100 largest leases last year, up from 32 transactions during 2020. E-commerce-only occupiers that ship only to residences came in second with 21 deals, followed by food and beverage users with 15 deals.

E-commerce occupiers closed 35 megadeals in 2020, up from 19 the year before. E-commerce demand surged mightily in 2020 as more consumers ordered online because stores were hit during the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic, consumers were afraid to return to stores once they reopened, and many Americans found online ordering to be convenient.

Mark Solomon

Formerly the Executive Editor at DC Velocity, Mark Solomon joined FreightWaves as Managing Editor of Freight Markets. Solomon began his journalistic career in 1982 at Traffic World magazine, ran his own public relations firm (Media Based Solutions) from 1994 to 2008, and has been at DC Velocity since then. Over the course of his career, Solomon has covered nearly the whole gamut of the transportation and logistics industry, including trucking, railroads, maritime, 3PLs, and regulatory issues. Solomon witnessed and narrated the rise of Amazon and XPO Logistics and the shift of the U.S. Postal Service from a mail-focused service to parcel, as well as the exponential, e-commerce-driven growth of warehouse square footage and omnichannel fulfillment.