• ITVI.USA
    14,680.190
    702.640
    5%
  • OTRI.USA
    27.570
    -0.300
    -1.1%
  • OTVI.USA
    14,638.600
    701.900
    5%
  • TLT.USA
    2.590
    -0.050
    -1.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.850
    0.220
    8.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.310
    0.440
    15.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.400
    0.050
    3.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    2.670
    0.660
    32.8%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.120
    0.240
    12.8%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.070
    0.300
    10.8%
  • WAIT.USA
    125.000
    -2.000
    -1.6%
  • ITVI.USA
    14,680.190
    702.640
    5%
  • OTRI.USA
    27.570
    -0.300
    -1.1%
  • OTVI.USA
    14,638.600
    701.900
    5%
  • TLT.USA
    2.590
    -0.050
    -1.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.850
    0.220
    8.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.310
    0.440
    15.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.400
    0.050
    3.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    2.670
    0.660
    32.8%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.120
    0.240
    12.8%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.070
    0.300
    10.8%
  • WAIT.USA
    125.000
    -2.000
    -1.6%
NewsTop StoriesTrucking

Complete breakfast? Cocaine-frosted cereal seized in Ohio

Customs agents discover $2.8M in corn flakes covered in cocaine instead of sugar

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agents recently seized a shipment of cereal from South America that they said was covered in cocaine instead of sugar.

CBP officers reportedly intercepted the cocaine in a shipment of cereal originating from Peru on Feb. 13 at the Port of Cincinnati.

CBP narcotic K-9 Bico was working incoming freight from Peru when he was alerted to a large shipment of cereal headed to a private residence in Hong Kong, investigators said.

CBP narcotic K-9 Bico alerted agents to the cocaine in the cereal. (Photo: CBP)

Officers reportedly tested the shipment and found it contained about 44 pounds of cocaine-coated corn flakes, with a street value of up to $2.8 million.

Cincinnati Port Director Richard Gillespie said that smugglers will hide narcotics in anything. 

“The men and women at the Port of Cincinnati continue to use their training, intuition and strategic skills to prevent these kinds of illegitimate shipments from reaching the public,” Gillespie said in a release

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Noi Mahoney

Noi Mahoney is a Texas-based journalist who covers Mexico cross-border trucking, logistics and trade for FreightWaves. He graduated from the University of Texas at Austin with a degree in English in 1999. Mahoney has more than 20 years experience as journalist, working for newspapers in Florida, Maryland and Texas. Contact nmahoney@freightwaves.com

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