• ITVI.USA
    13,795.070
    81.410
    0.6%
  • OTRI.USA
    26.560
    -0.120
    -0.4%
  • OTVI.USA
    13,740.380
    64.000
    0.5%
  • TLT.USA
    2.720
    -0.060
    -2.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.670
    0.130
    5.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    2.930
    0.280
    10.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.320
    -0.020
    -1.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.040
    0.050
    1.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.740
    0.050
    3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.210
    0.000
    0%
  • WAIT.USA
    108.000
    5.000
    4.9%
  • ITVI.USA
    13,795.070
    81.410
    0.6%
  • OTRI.USA
    26.560
    -0.120
    -0.4%
  • OTVI.USA
    13,740.380
    64.000
    0.5%
  • TLT.USA
    2.720
    -0.060
    -2.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.670
    0.130
    5.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    2.930
    0.280
    10.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.320
    -0.020
    -1.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.040
    0.050
    1.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.740
    0.050
    3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.210
    0.000
    0%
  • WAIT.USA
    108.000
    5.000
    4.9%
Weather and Critical Events

Flash flood risk shifts to Southwest U.S. today

Southwest soaking

Heavy rainfall could drench portions of New Mexico and the Texas Panhandle later today, October 3, and tonight, producing an additional one to three inches. This will happen in some areas hit by torrential rains yesterday. Due to potential flash flooding, drivers may run into roadblocks along and south of the I-40 corridor, as well as along and east of the I-25 corridor. This affects cities from Roswell and Carlsbad to Amarillo. Flooding should be localized/scattered rather than widespread, so delays should be fairly short-lived. The National Weather Service (NWS) has issued a Flash Flood Watch for the region.

SONAR Critical Events: Thursday, October 3, 9:00 a.m. EDT

Showers and thunderstorms will also pass over the I-95 corridor, mainly north of the Mason-Dixon line. A few severe storms farther inland may contain large hail, very gusty winds and heavy rain from eastern Ohio to central Pennsylvania, including Youngstown, Pittsburgh, Erie and State College.

Record-breaking heat will hit parts of the Southeast again, as well as parts of the Ohio River Valley and the Mid-Atlantic region. High temperatures will sizzle, ranging from the lower-90s to near 100° from Columbus, Ohio to Raleigh, Nashville, Memphis, Atlanta, Birmingham, and Jackson, Mississippi.

Additional notes

A section of Norfolk Southern rail is out of service in Missouri between Moberly and Kansas City because of a debris strike to the Grand River bridge in Brunswick, Missouri. This was caused by the recent heavy rains and flooding. Shippers operating through this area should expect delays of 48 to 72 hours.

Some lanes and ramps of the I-10 bridge over the San Jacinto River, just east of Houston, remain closed. This is due to damage during last month’s flooding from Tropical Storm Imelda.

Also, I-29 in Iowa remains closed due to flooding, from just north of Council Bluffs to Loveland.


Tropical update

SONAR Critical Events: Tropical Storm Mitag, Thursday, October 3, 2:00 a.m. EDT (3:00 p.m. Japan Standard Time)

Tropical Storm Mitag flooded parts of South Korea yesterday, October 2, causing landslides and killing at least four people. It has weakened a great deal, but could still produce areas of heavy rain and gusty winds in northern Japan tonight and tomorrow. Shippers should expect only minor, short-term delays in ocean and air cargo.

Have a great day, and be careful out there!

Tags

Nick Austin, Director of Weather Analytics and Senior Meteorologist

In his nearly 20 years of weather forecasting experience, Nick worked on air at WBBJ-TV and WRCB-TV, including time spent doing weather analysis and field reporting. He received his Bachelor of Science in Meteorology from Florida State University as well as a Bachelor of Science in Management from Georgia Institute of Technology. Nick is also a member of the American Meteorological Society and National Weather Association. As a member of the weather team at WBBJ-TV in Jackson, Tennessee, Nick was nominated for a Mid-South Emmy for live coverage of a major tornado outbreak in 2008. As part of the weather team at WRCB-TV in Chattanooga, Tennessee, Nick shared the Chattanooga Times-Free Press Best of the Best award for “Best Weather Team” for eight consecutive years. Nick earned his National Weather Association Broadcasting Seal in 2005.
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