• ITVI.USA
    14,959.950
    116.940
    0.8%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.933
    0.012
    0.4%
  • OTRI.USA
    19.350
    0.220
    1.2%
  • OTVI.USA
    14,926.910
    120.050
    0.8%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.910
    -0.050
    -1.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.790
    0.080
    2.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.460
    0.170
    13.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.740
    0.020
    0.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.270
    0.030
    1.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.150
    -0.010
    -0.2%
  • WAIT.USA
    131.000
    -2.000
    -1.5%
  • ITVI.USA
    14,959.950
    116.940
    0.8%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.933
    0.012
    0.4%
  • OTRI.USA
    19.350
    0.220
    1.2%
  • OTVI.USA
    14,926.910
    120.050
    0.8%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.910
    -0.050
    -1.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.790
    0.080
    2.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.460
    0.170
    13.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.740
    0.020
    0.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.270
    0.030
    1.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.150
    -0.010
    -0.2%
  • WAIT.USA
    131.000
    -2.000
    -1.5%
InsightsNewsWeather and Critical Events

Major winter storm aiming for central, eastern US

Impacts likely from Plains to East Coast

If they’re able to run at all, truckers could hit a doozy of a winter storm over the next several days as it carves a path across the eastern U.S.


Related: Chaining up: 4 pro tips for truckers


The storm will start in southern Canada, dumping 5 to 10 inches of snow in parts of the U.S. northern Plains and Midwest from late Thursday through Friday. This swath of snow will stretch more than 650 miles from northern North Dakota to northern Missouri.

Widespread blowing or drifting snow isn’t likely in this region, but it may happen in a few areas, limiting visibility at times.

What makes this storm noteworthy is the potential combination of ice, snow and high winds it could produce in highly populated areas beginning this weekend.

The storm will head to the Southeast on Saturday and could be a snow maker for parts of the Ohio Valley, Mid-South and southern Appalachians. Freezing rain and icy conditions could develop in some areas, possibly from Atlanta to portions of the Carolinas.

As this storm travels up the East Coast from Sunday afternoon into Monday, it will probably intensify rapidly into a strong nor’easter.

The storm will impact, to varying degrees, much of the Interstate 95 corridor from the Southeast to New England. However, the most significant impacts and severe disruptions from heavy snow will likely be across the interior Northeast and mid-Atlantic rather than along the East Coast and I-95.

Much of the I-95 corridor will have a mixture of snow, sleet and freezing rain at the onset of the storm before the precipitation turns to just rain. Very strong winds along the coast and I-95 corridor, along with the wintry mix, will cause issues and disruptions. Coastal flooding is also possible.


Related: Small carriers taking big hits from I-95 shutdown


Since this potential storm is still a few days away, there is debate on the precise location of the heavy snow, ice and strongest winds. A shift of only 20 to 30 miles to the west or east can change everything. But, all in all, the odds are increasing that this storm will be a major disrupter to transportation, supply chains and business operations. Truckers may not be able to run in some areas. At the least, they will have to slow down or stop at times, leading to delays.

Follow updates on FreightWaves’ website and social media accounts.

Major lanes of concern

• Interstate 29 from Grand Forks, North Dakota, to Kansas City, Missouri.
• Interstate 20 from Florence, South Carolina, to Atlanta.
• Interstate 35 from Des Moines, Iowa, to Kansas City.
• Interstate 80 from Iowa City, Iowa, to Omaha, Nebraska.
• Interstate 85 from Petersburg, Virginia, to Atlanta, Georgia.
• Interstate 94 from Bismarck to Fargo, North Dakota.
• Interstate 95 from Florence to the Maine-Canada border.

Click here for more FreightWaves articles by Nick Austin.

You might also like:

Historic floods ‘hammered’ British Columbia’s trucking industry
A look back: 6 impactful weather events in 2021 transportation
51-year Sierra snowfall record shattered

Nick Austin, Director of Weather Analytics and Senior Meteorologist

In his 20 years of on-air experience, Nick has worked on air at WBBJ-TV and WRCB-TV forecasting weather and reporting on weather from the field. He received his Bachelor of Science in Meteorology from Florida State University, as well as a Bachelor of Science in Management from the Georgia Institute of Technology. Nick is a member of the American Meteorological Society and National Weather Association. As a member of the weather team at WBBJ-TV in Jackson, Tennessee, Nick was nominated for a Mid-South Emmy for live coverage of a major tornado outbreak in February 2008. As part of the weather team at WRCB-TV in Chattanooga, Tennessee, Nick shared the Chattanooga Times-Free Press Best of the Best award for “Best Weather Team” eight consecutive years.