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‘Mayday’ protest underway at nation’s Capitol as truckers protest low rates

Photo credit: Scott Jordan

A convoy of around 70 small-business truckers convoyed to the nation’s Capitol around 2:30 a.m. on Friday, May 1, to protest low freight rates amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

The group plans to remain parked along Constitution Avenue until May 4 in hopes of attracting the attention of President Donald Trump about the plight of small-business truckers, said Scott Jordan of Peculiar, Missouri, and owner of Powerhouse Transportation.

He has written a letter, which he hopes to deliver to Trump in person.

“As trucking continues to deteriorate to the point of starvation, we essential small-business truckers have decided it is time to make trucking great again,” Jordan told FreightWaves. “We are encouraging anyone to join us in an effort to save small-business truckers from ruination during this critical time in our nation.” 

While Jordan said it’s too late to save his four-truck operation as his equipment is scheduled to be repossessed by the bank next week, he is in D.C. to support others who may be teetering on the brink of closure. 

“My company is going to die through this process, but I was able to find my owner-operators good companies to work for,” he told FreightWaves. “They didn’t want to leave, but I told them I am the captain of the ship, get on the lifeboat and go. I didn’t want anybody riding with me until the end because I wanted to make sure every driver was paid.”


A convoy of around 70 truckers convoyed to the nation’s Capitol around 2:30 a.m. on Friday, May 1. Photo: Scott Jordan

While the truckers didn’t obtain the necessary permits for their May Day protest, Jordan said the Capitol Police have been great to them so far.

“We’re exercising our First Amendment rights to peacefully assemble and address our grievances with our government,” he said.

All morning, truckers have been blaring their horns, which Jordan said is an SOS call to the president.

“All we want is to meet with President Trump and let him know that small-business truckers need a fair and equitable shake as many mega-brokers don’t want to even deal with companies like mine with fewer than 10 trucks,” he said. “For somebody that’s given their heart and soul to this country to get treated like shit all the time, it sucks. This really is my last ride.”

More protests are scheduled in Los Angeles and Chicago today. 

Some truckers participating in the mayday demonstration say they want the government to put a cap on the percentage brokers can take on a load.

However, DuWayne Marshall of Watertown, Wisconsin, who was a 35-year trucking veteran before retiring after the electronic logging device (ELD) mandate took effect, says asking the government to step in and regulate freight rates is “dangerous.”

Marshall, who hauled produce as an independent owner-operator, also owned a brokerage company.

“Some are saying that brokers should only be able to take a certain percentage of the load, so if it becomes regulated, now a broker is always going to take that amount even if the load is a piece of junk,” Marshall told FreightWaves. “So, on a load that I would have overpaid just to get it moved for my customer, now I will never be allowed to overpay on a load again. That’s why a cap on rates is dangerous.”

While some truck drivers are being offered rates around $1 per mile or less, Marshall’s advice to them is simple: Don’t take it.

“The only reason why brokers are offering these loads at those low prices is because some truck drivers are moving those loads for that price,” he said. “Truckers have been their own worst enemy forever. Truckers have to know their worth and if they all refuse to haul for $1 a mile, then brokers will have to up the rates to get their freight moved. Right now, there’s no incentive for them to do so.”

When truck capacity was tight after the ELD mandate took effect, Marshall said carriers were able to name their price to shippers to get loads moved. But now that there are more trucks than loads during the pandemic because many businesses are shut down, brokers may have the upper hand, for now, Marshall said.

“The markets make these wide swings, but when you ask the government to step in and regulate the swing, it’s never good,” Marshall said. 

This is a developing story.

Read more articles by FreightWaves’ Clarissa Hawes

22 Comments

  1. Florie Wilcox

    why do we have to fight for or our rights We Have Rites why do they have to put us out of business were all smaller business companies who are trying to make a decent living !Lets Ask PRESIDENT TRUMP,

  2. Solomon

    They trying to push us out of business we are doing hard work this’s how they payed us all brokers they make good money,But they don’t give you shit driver’s.

  3. Al'Jawann Reed

    If we as truckers and men stick together we can change the ways we are treated as employees and employers a good trucking union is what’s needed so we can dictate pay and benefits that are worthy and that show some type of understanding and overall worth. and.appreciation we deserve. God Bless you all and stay safe and strong on the roads.

  4. Gerald Chege

    Broker will send rc and then tell the dispatch”ask your driver not to show that rate confirmation to shipper”, I wonder why

  5. Tom

    Brokers do what they do… That is charge their customer as much as they can and then pay the least that they must to get the load delivered… Are they raping the line haul rate for 50- 60 % or more??? Maybe, maybe not. They only way to know is to exercise the right afforded to carriers under 49 CFR § 371.3 – Records to be kept by brokers. (C) Each party to a brokered transaction has the right to review the record of the transaction required to be kept by these rules. All of you who have gathered to demand a regulation providing transparency!!! That regulation has existed since the 1980s… READ THE DAMN BROKER CARRIER CONTRACTS BEFORE YOU SIGN THEM… AND REFUSE TO SIGN ANY CONTRACT THAT DISALLOWS THE TRANSPARENCY ISSUE… FOR THAT MATTER…. DON’T SIGN ANY CONTRACT AND RUN UNDER A STANDARD BOL AND YOUR PROFIT MARGINS WILL INCREASE 10 FOLD AND YOU WILL AGAIN GUIDE YOUR OWN DESTINY RATHER THAN JUST BEING JERKED DOWN THE ROAD HAVING NO CONTROL AND FAILING CAUSE YOU GAVE ALL THE POWER TO THE GD BROKER !!!!

  6. MIKE

    What Is the Law of Supply and Demand?
    The law of supply and demand is a theory that explains the interaction between the sellers of a resource and the buyers for that resource. The theory defines what effect the relationship between the availability of a particular product and the desire (or demand) for that product has on its price. Generally, low supply and high demand increase price and vice versa. Perfect examples of supply and demand in action include PayPal.

    KEY TAKEAWAYS
    The law of demand says that at higher prices, buyers will demand less of an economic good.
    The law of supply says that at higher prices, sellers will supply more of an economic good.
    These two laws interact to determine the actual market prices and volume of goods that are traded on a market.
    Several independent factors can affect the shape of market supply and demand, influencing both the prices and quantities that we observe in markets.

    1. Al'Jawann Reed

      If we as truckers and men stick together we can change the ways we are treated as employees and employers a good trucking union is what’s needed so we can dictate pay and benefits that are worthy and that show some type of understanding and overall worth. and.appreciation we deserve. God Bless you all and stay safe and strong on the roads.

  7. Art

    Wonder what the overhead for Marshalls brokerage operation was. Wonder for each load he overpaid for how many loads did he cut rates and pay bottom of the barrel pricing? Wonder if it’s his equipment getting repossessed. Wonder if his opinion is valid in this article.

Comments are closed.

Clarissa Hawes

Clarissa has covered all aspects of the trucking industry for 14 years. She is an award-winning journalist known for her investigative and business reporting. Before joining FreightWaves, she wrote for Land Line Magazine and Trucks.com. If you have a news tip or story idea, send her an email to [email protected]