• ITVI.USA
    9,157.620
    -27.560
    -0.3%
  • OTRI.USA
    2.590
    -0.020
    -0.8%
  • OTVI.USA
    9,162.320
    -26.570
    -0.3%
  • TLT.USA
    2.670
    -0.010
    -0.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.230
    -0.070
    -5.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.100
    -0.030
    -2.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    1.290
    -0.060
    -4.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    1.700
    0.130
    8.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    1.520
    0.060
    4.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    1.120
    -0.030
    -2.6%
  • WAIT.USA
    139.000
    -12.000
    -7.9%
  • ITVI.USA
    9,157.620
    -27.560
    -0.3%
  • OTRI.USA
    2.590
    -0.020
    -0.8%
  • OTVI.USA
    9,162.320
    -26.570
    -0.3%
  • TLT.USA
    2.670
    -0.010
    -0.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.230
    -0.070
    -5.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.100
    -0.030
    -2.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    1.290
    -0.060
    -4.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    1.700
    0.130
    8.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    1.520
    0.060
    4.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    1.120
    -0.030
    -2.6%
  • WAIT.USA
    139.000
    -12.000
    -7.9%
InsightsNewsWeather and Critical Events

Severe storms, tornadoes still on track to slam southern states (with forecast video)

High-volume Atlanta, Dallas, Houston freight markets in potential risk zones

Severe thunderstorms and tornadoes will likely slam many southern states over the next two days, including areas that were hit by deadly storms the past two weekends. This may not surprise a lot of people; after all, spring is the prime-time severe weather season for this part of the country. Nonetheless, shippers and carriers should expect occasional delays in freight movement as drivers will have to slow down from time to time, encountering possible roadblocks due to high water or downed trees and power lines.

SONAR Critical Events and radar: Wednesday, April 22, 10 a.m. EDT; Severe thunderstorm risk areas

A strong low pressure system spinning over the Texas panhandle will head to the Southeast later today through tomorrow, April 23. This system will likely produce numerous to widespread severe thunderstorms from Texas to South Carolina over the two-day period. These storms could produce many tornadoes – including strong tornadoes of EF-2 strength or higher – as well as intense straight-line wind gusts of 60+ mph, large hail and torrential rainfall.

Today, 3 to 6 inches of rainfall could soak parts of northern Louisiana and western Mississippi, causing possible flash flooding. Tha same could happen tomorrow in portions of Alabama, Georgia and northern Florida with 2 to 5 inches of rainfall likely.

Some of the major metropolitan areas in the potential impact zones include Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; Austin, Dallas and Houston, Texas; Little Rock, Arkansas; Baton Rouge and New Orleans, Louisiana; Jackson, Mississippi; Mobile and Birmingham, Alabama; Atlanta, Macon and Savannah, Georgia; Tallahassee and Jacksonville, Florida; and Charleston, South Carolina.

Atlanta, Dallas and Houston are three major freight markets with good chances of seeing severe weather, and the Atlanta-to-Houston lane remains busy for freight movement. According to the latest FreightWaves SONAR data, all three markets have high levels of outbound tender volumes (OTVI), despite slight decreases in Atlanta and Houston over the past week.

SONAR Ticker: OTVI Map (left); SONAR Tickers: OTRI.ATL, OTRI.HOU; OTRI.DAL

Atlanta is the largest market, accounting for 4.4% of the nation’s outbound volume. Dallas and Houston are also in the top 10, with a combined 5.7% of the nation’s outbound volume. Also, outbound tender rejections (OTRI) for each of these markets is less than 4%, meaning carriers are accepting a high level of electronically offered loads from shippers.

Have a great day! Please stay healthy and be careful out there!

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Nick Austin, Director of Weather Analytics and Senior Meteorologist

In his 17 years of weather forecasting experience, Nick worked on air at WBBJ-TV and WRCB-TV, including time spent doing weather analysis and field reporting. He received his Bachelor of Science in Meteorology from Florida State University as well as a Bachelor of Science in Management from Georgia Institute of Technology. Nick is also a member of the American Meteorological Society and National Weather Association. As a member of the weather team at WBBJ-TV in Jackson, Tennessee, Nick was nominated for a Mid-South Emmy for live coverage of a major tornado outbreak in 2008. As part of the weather team at WRCB-TV in Chattanooga, Tennessee, Nick shared the Chattanooga Times-Free Press Best of the Best award for “Best Weather Team” for eight consecutive years. Nick earned his National Weather Association Broadcasting Seal in 2005.

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