• ITVI.USA
    16,350.840
    -55.350
    -0.3%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.731
    0.025
    0.9%
  • OTRI.USA
    21.660
    -0.160
    -0.7%
  • OTVI.USA
    16,343.200
    -45.660
    -0.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    3.520
    0.380
    12.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    2.960
    -0.660
    -18.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.610
    0.250
    18.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.340
    -0.130
    -3.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.100
    -0.250
    -10.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.860
    -0.220
    -5.4%
  • WAIT.USA
    126.000
    -2.000
    -1.6%
  • ITVI.USA
    16,350.840
    -55.350
    -0.3%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.731
    0.025
    0.9%
  • OTRI.USA
    21.660
    -0.160
    -0.7%
  • OTVI.USA
    16,343.200
    -45.660
    -0.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    3.520
    0.380
    12.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    2.960
    -0.660
    -18.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.610
    0.250
    18.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.340
    -0.130
    -3.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.100
    -0.250
    -10.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.860
    -0.220
    -5.4%
  • WAIT.USA
    126.000
    -2.000
    -1.6%
American ShipperShipping

Canadian grain shipments float St. Lawrence Seaway’s volume

   A bumper crop of Canadian grain has led to a 70-percent increase in maritime shipments via the St. Lawrence Seaway over last year’s season, according to the Chamber of Marine Commerce.
   The St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corp. reported that while combined Canada-U.S. grain shipments are up 55 percent, Canadian grain shipments alone from March 25 to July 31 totaled 3.6 million metric tons. 
   “The Great Lakes-Seaway system has always been a strong export route for grain, but this season has really demonstrated that farmers would have been in great difficulty without it. Marine shipping on the seaway is preventing huge transportation bottlenecks, and we’re looking forward to moving the next harvest this fall,” said Bruce Hodgson, director of market development for the St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corp., in a statement.
   The chamber noted more than 2,500 railcars of Prairie grain are being unloaded each week at Canada’s Port of Thunder Bay. Last year, the weekly average was 939 railcars. For the third month in a row, ocean and domestic vessels carried 1 million metric tons of grain out of the port and through the St. Lawrence Seaway in July, and August is expected to be the same, the chamber added. 
   “We have 1.2 million metric tons of storage capacity, and we have the ocean and domestic carriers to handle these volumes, with forecasters talking about another good harvest on its way,” said Tim Heney, president and chief executive officer of the Thunder Bay Port Authority.

Chris Gillis

Located in the Washington, D.C. area, Chris Gillis primarily reports on regulatory and legislative topics that impact cross-border trade. He joined American Shipper in 1994, shortly after graduating from Mount St. Mary’s College in Emmitsburg, Md., with a degree in international business and economics.

We are glad you’re enjoying the content

Sign up for a free FreightWaves account today for unlimited access to all of our latest content

By signing in for the first time, I give consent for FreightWaves to send me event updates and news. I can unsubscribe from these emails at any time. For more information please see our Privacy Policy.