• DATVF.ATLPHL
    1.814
    0.044
    2.5%
  • DATVF.CHIATL
    2.034
    0.018
    0.9%
  • DATVF.DALLAX
    0.921
    0.071
    8.4%
  • DATVF.LAXDAL
    1.502
    -0.092
    -5.8%
  • DATVF.SEALAX
    0.962
    -0.053
    -5.2%
  • DATVF.PHLCHI
    1.091
    -0.038
    -3.4%
  • DATVF.LAXSEA
    2.146
    -0.004
    -0.2%
  • DATVF.VEU
    1.647
    0.009
    0.5%
  • DATVF.VNU
    1.471
    -0.010
    -0.7%
  • DATVF.VSU
    1.211
    -0.011
    -0.9%
  • DATVF.VWU
    1.554
    -0.028
    -1.8%
  • ITVI.USA
    9,689.350
    14.490
    0.1%
  • OTRI.USA
    7.650
    -0.020
    -0.3%
  • OTVI.USA
    9,678.010
    13.740
    0.1%
  • TLT.USA
    2.730
    0.000
    0%
  • WAIT.USA
    156.000
    -2.000
    -1.3%
  • DATVF.ATLPHL
    1.814
    0.044
    2.5%
  • DATVF.CHIATL
    2.034
    0.018
    0.9%
  • DATVF.DALLAX
    0.921
    0.071
    8.4%
  • DATVF.LAXDAL
    1.502
    -0.092
    -5.8%
  • DATVF.SEALAX
    0.962
    -0.053
    -5.2%
  • DATVF.PHLCHI
    1.091
    -0.038
    -3.4%
  • DATVF.LAXSEA
    2.146
    -0.004
    -0.2%
  • DATVF.VEU
    1.647
    0.009
    0.5%
  • DATVF.VNU
    1.471
    -0.010
    -0.7%
  • DATVF.VSU
    1.211
    -0.011
    -0.9%
  • DATVF.VWU
    1.554
    -0.028
    -1.8%
  • ITVI.USA
    9,689.350
    14.490
    0.1%
  • OTRI.USA
    7.650
    -0.020
    -0.3%
  • OTVI.USA
    9,678.010
    13.740
    0.1%
  • TLT.USA
    2.730
    0.000
    0%
  • WAIT.USA
    156.000
    -2.000
    -1.3%
American ShipperShippingTrade and Compliance

Commerce issues duties on Chinese 53-foot containers

The Commerce Department has concluded there’s both dumping and subsidization of these imports from China.

   The Commerce Department has concluded that imports of 53-foot domestic dry containers from China are both dumped on the U.S. market and the companies that manufacture them receive subsidies from the Chinese government.
   Dumping occurs when an overseas company sells product in the United States at less than fair value, while counterviable subsidies are financial assistance from foreign governments to their domestic industries to benefit production of goods ultimately for export.
   Commerce determined that imports of these containers from China have been sold in the United States at dumping margins ranging from 107.19 percent to 111.22 percent. The department also found these imports have received countervailable subsidies ranging from 17.13 percent to 28 percent.
   Chinese companies that received a final dumping margin of 111.22 percent included Hui Zhou Pacific Container Co., Qingdao Pacific Container Co, Qidong Singamas Energy Equipment Co., and Singamas Management Services Ltd. Companies assigned the China-wide final dumping margin rate of 107.19 are China International Marine Containers (Group) Co., China International Marine Containers (HK), Xinhui CIMC Special Transportation Equipment Co., Nantong CIMC-Special Transportation Equipment Manufacture Co., and Qingdao CIMC Container Manufacture Co.
   Commerce calculated a final subsidy rate in its countervailing duty investigation of 28 percent for China International Marine Containers (Group) Co., and seven affiliates. Hui Zhou Pacific Container Co., Qingdao Pacific Container Co., and Qidong Singamas Energy Equipment Co. received a final subsidy rate of 17.13 percent. All other producers in China have been assigned a final subsidy rate of 22.57 percent.
   For its antidumping findings, Commerce has instructed Customs and Border Protection to collect cash deposits equal to the weighted average dumping margins. If the U.S. International Trade Commission makes a negative determination in this case, both the antidumping and countervailing duty investigations will be terminated and the cash deposits collected in the interim will be refunded, Commerce said. The ITC’s final decision is due by May 26.
   Stoughton Trailers in Wisconsin filed the petition for the antidumping and countervailing duty investigations on April 23, 2014. 
   According to Commerce, imports of 53-foot domestic dry containers from China were valued at $365 million in 2014.

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Chris Gillis

Located in the Washington, D.C. area, Chris Gillis primarily reports on regulatory and legislative topics that impact cross-border trade. He joined American Shipper in 1994, shortly after graduating from Mount St. Mary’s College in Emmitsburg, Md., with a degree in international business and economics.
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