• DATVF.ATLPHL
    1.751
    -0.063
    -3.5%
  • DATVF.CHIATL
    2.041
    0.007
    0.3%
  • DATVF.DALLAX
    0.928
    0.007
    0.8%
  • DATVF.LAXDAL
    1.459
    -0.043
    -2.9%
  • DATVF.SEALAX
    0.984
    0.022
    2.3%
  • DATVF.PHLCHI
    1.110
    0.019
    1.7%
  • DATVF.LAXSEA
    2.155
    0.009
    0.4%
  • DATVF.VEU
    1.634
    -0.013
    -0.8%
  • DATVF.VNU
    1.466
    -0.005
    -0.3%
  • DATVF.VSU
    1.194
    -0.017
    -1.4%
  • DATVF.VWU
    1.569
    0.015
    1%
  • ITVI.USA
    9,394.010
    -295.340
    -3%
  • OTRI.USA
    7.540
    -0.110
    -1.4%
  • OTVI.USA
    9,375.560
    -302.450
    -3.1%
  • TLT.USA
    2.730
    0.000
    0%
  • WAIT.USA
    156.000
    -2.000
    -1.3%
  • DATVF.ATLPHL
    1.751
    -0.063
    -3.5%
  • DATVF.CHIATL
    2.041
    0.007
    0.3%
  • DATVF.DALLAX
    0.928
    0.007
    0.8%
  • DATVF.LAXDAL
    1.459
    -0.043
    -2.9%
  • DATVF.SEALAX
    0.984
    0.022
    2.3%
  • DATVF.PHLCHI
    1.110
    0.019
    1.7%
  • DATVF.LAXSEA
    2.155
    0.009
    0.4%
  • DATVF.VEU
    1.634
    -0.013
    -0.8%
  • DATVF.VNU
    1.466
    -0.005
    -0.3%
  • DATVF.VSU
    1.194
    -0.017
    -1.4%
  • DATVF.VWU
    1.569
    0.015
    1%
  • ITVI.USA
    9,394.010
    -295.340
    -3%
  • OTRI.USA
    7.540
    -0.110
    -1.4%
  • OTVI.USA
    9,375.560
    -302.450
    -3.1%
  • TLT.USA
    2.730
    0.000
    0%
  • WAIT.USA
    156.000
    -2.000
    -1.3%
American ShipperShippingTrade and Compliance

DOT proposes sleep apnea tests for truckers, railroad workers

The U.S. Transportation Department’s Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration and Federal Railroad Administration have proposed rules to screen, evaluate and treat truck drivers and railroad workers for obstructive sleep apnea.

   The U.S. Transportation Department’s Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration and Federal Railroad Administration have proposed rules to screen, evaluate and treat truck drivers and railroad workers for obstructive sleep apnea.
   The National Transportation Safety Board recommended that DOT take action to address sleep apnea screening and treatment for these workers.
   “It is imperative for everyone’s safety that commercial motor vehicle drivers and train operators be fully focused and immediately responsive at all times,” U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx said in a statement Tuesday.
   It’s estimated that 22 million Americans could be suffering from the respiratory disorder which causes a reduction or cessation of breathing during sleep. Left untreated, it can deplete attention, concentration, memory, and the capacity to safely respond to hazards on the job.
   “The size and scope of the potential problem means that OSA presents a critical safety issue for all modes and operations in the transportation industry,” DOT said.
   “The collection and analysis of sound data on the impact of OSA must be our immediate first step,” said FMCSA Acting Administrator Scott Darling.  “We call upon the public to help us better understand the prevalence of OSA among commercial truck and bus drivers, as well as the safety and economic impacts on the truck and bus industries.”
   The two DOT agencies are seeking public input on the proposed rule over the next 90 days and will host three public listening sessions to gather input on OSA in Washington, DC, Chicago, and Los Angeles.
   The FRA is also working on a rule that will require certain railroads to establish fatigue management plans. In 2012, the agency joined with the Division of Sleep Medicine at Harvard Medical School, WFBH Education Foundation and the John A. Volpe National Transportation Systems Center to sponsor the Railroaders’ Guide to Healthy Sleep website. The site provides educational information to railroaders and their families about sleep disorders and information to improve sleep quality.
   For any commercial truck drivers who are detected to have a respiratory dysfunction, like sleep apnea, FMCSA currently recommends that medical examiners refer them for further evaluation and therapy.

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Chris Gillis

Located in the Washington, D.C. area, Chris Gillis primarily reports on regulatory and legislative topics that impact cross-border trade. He joined American Shipper in 1994, shortly after graduating from Mount St. Mary’s College in Emmitsburg, Md., with a degree in international business and economics.
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