• ITVI.USA
    9,157.620
    -27.560
    -0.3%
  • OTRI.USA
    2.590
    -0.020
    -0.8%
  • OTVI.USA
    9,162.320
    -26.570
    -0.3%
  • TLT.USA
    2.670
    -0.010
    -0.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.230
    -0.070
    -5.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.100
    -0.030
    -2.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    1.290
    -0.060
    -4.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    1.700
    0.130
    8.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    1.520
    0.060
    4.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    1.120
    -0.030
    -2.6%
  • WAIT.USA
    139.000
    -12.000
    -7.9%
  • ITVI.USA
    9,157.620
    -27.560
    -0.3%
  • OTRI.USA
    2.590
    -0.020
    -0.8%
  • OTVI.USA
    9,162.320
    -26.570
    -0.3%
  • TLT.USA
    2.670
    -0.010
    -0.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.230
    -0.070
    -5.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.100
    -0.030
    -2.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    1.290
    -0.060
    -4.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    1.700
    0.130
    8.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    1.520
    0.060
    4.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    1.120
    -0.030
    -2.6%
  • WAIT.USA
    139.000
    -12.000
    -7.9%
American ShipperTrade and Compliance

Keeping unwanted invaders out of Valentine’s flowers

The most common pests intercepted by U.S. Customs and Border Protection agriculture specialists in imported flowers are aphids, thrips, moths, miner flies and mites.

   U.S. Customs and Border Protection agriculture specialists know that imported flowers, while a thoughtful gift for Valentine’s Day, can hide pests that could harm the nation’s agricultural industry and environment.
   From Jan. 1 to Feb. 7, CBP agricultural specialists at Los Angeles International Airport processed more than 16 million cut flower stems in 11,752 shipments and intercepted 191 pests.
   “They apply their scientific expertise in detecting, intercepting, identifying and ultimately preventing pests from contaminating America’s crops, livestock and the environment,” said Carlos C. Martel, CBP’s director of field operations in Los Angeles, in a statement.
   According to the agency, more than 66 percent of the cut flower stems are imported from Colombia, followed by 24 percent from Ecuador, 2.5 percent from Mexico and 1.7 percent from the Netherlands. The top three cut flower stems imported are roses, mixed bouquets and rose bouquets.
   The most common pests intercepted by CBP agriculture specialists in imported flowers are aphids, thrips, moths, miner flies and mites. 
   Between Jan. 1 and Feb. 7, LAX was the fourth-largest inbound port for flower imports. By far the largest port of entry for flowers during this period was Miami International Airport at 852,494,053 stems, followed by Florida’s Port Everglades at 24,803,948 stems and the Port of Miami at 18,028,518 stems, CBP said.
   Other large U.S. inbound ports for flowers during this same period included New York’s JFK International Airport (13,919,911 stems); Otay Mesa, Calif. (13,852,357 stems); Laredo, Texas (8,511,854 stems); San Diego (6,537,607 stems); New Jersey’s Newark (3.094,853 stems); and Chicago (2,347,079 stems), the agency noted.

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Chris Gillis

Located in the Washington, D.C. area, Chris Gillis primarily reports on regulatory and legislative topics that impact cross-border trade. He joined American Shipper in 1994, shortly after graduating from Mount St. Mary’s College in Emmitsburg, Md., with a degree in international business and economics.
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