• ITVI.USA
    15,536.540
    74.080
    0.5%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.754
    0.002
    0.1%
  • OTRI.USA
    20.490
    -0.180
    -0.9%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,507.170
    69.970
    0.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    3.300
    0.000
    0%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.140
    0.190
    6.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.590
    0.150
    10.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.330
    0.020
    0.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.170
    0.020
    0.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.080
    0.130
    3.3%
  • WAIT.USA
    125.000
    -1.000
    -0.8%
  • ITVI.USA
    15,536.540
    74.080
    0.5%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.754
    0.002
    0.1%
  • OTRI.USA
    20.490
    -0.180
    -0.9%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,507.170
    69.970
    0.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    3.300
    0.000
    0%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.140
    0.190
    6.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.590
    0.150
    10.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.330
    0.020
    0.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.170
    0.020
    0.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.080
    0.130
    3.3%
  • WAIT.USA
    125.000
    -1.000
    -0.8%
American ShipperShippingTrade and Compliance

Miami firm fined for luggage full of lithium batteries

The Federal Aviation Administration has proposed a $63,750 civil penalty against J&J Tech Group of Miami for allegedly violating federal hazardous materials transportation by stuffing “hundreds” of lithium batteries into luggage.

   The U.S. Transportation Department’s Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has proposed a $63,750 civil penalty against J&J Tech Group of Miami for allegedly violating federal hazardous materials transportation rules.
   The FAA alleges that on Feb. 22, 2017, two passengers affiliated with the company, who were flying on board an American Airlines flight from Miami to Buenos Aires, offered three checked bags containing “hundreds” of lithium ion batteries.
   According to the FAA’s final count, the luggage included 318 lithium ion batteries, as well as 85 cell phones and 11 laptop computers that contained lithium ion batteries. The shipment was not accompanied by a shipper’s declaration of dangerous goods and was not properly packaged for shipping by air transport.
   In addition, FAA rules prohibit the transport of lithium batteries as cargo on passenger flights.

Chris Gillis

Located in the Washington, D.C. area, Chris Gillis primarily reports on regulatory and legislative topics that impact cross-border trade. He joined American Shipper in 1994, shortly after graduating from Mount St. Mary’s College in Emmitsburg, Md., with a degree in international business and economics.

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