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Welcome to the transparency generation

OmniTrail micro-location chips could help warehouse workers locate boxes and pallets quicker. 

OmniTrail is leading the way as micro-location tracking is poised to enter the mainstream

In an era of big data, GPS and cloud-based solutions, few shippers and receivers have the stomach for shipping blind. The days of putting a package on a truck and assuming it will end up at the correct destination are long gone.

Welcome to the transparency generation.

The reality is we have been transitioning into this generation for several years, but technology is advancing so fast that what seemed impossible a few years ago is not only possible, but ready for primetime.

In most cases, tracking packages requires a number of inputs – such as a driver or warehouse worker scanning a barcode – and GPS. There are some companies, though, that are seeking to disrupt that with low-cost trackers that can not only tell you where a pallet is, but where an individual box is located and do it all without worker input.

Say hello to OmniTrail Technologies, an “enterprise micro-location technology” company based in Santa Clara, CA, that was founded in 2010 by Shah Ullah and Niaz Khan.

“When I was at Cisco, I was very intrigued by the technology,” Henry Vinton, vice president of business development and enterprise sales, tells FreightWaves. “We’ve built the protocol from the ground up to not interfere with WiFi and be very efficient and get much [more accuracy].”


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Brian Straight

Brian Straight covers general transportation news and leads the editorial team as Managing Editor. A journalism graduate of the University of Rhode Island, he has covered everything from a presidential election, to professional sports and Little League baseball, and for more than 10 years has covered trucking and logistics. Before joining FreightWaves, he was previously responsible for the editorial quality and production of Fleet Owner magazine and fleetowner.com. Brian lives in Connecticut with his wife and two kids and spends his time coaching his son’s baseball team, golfing with his daughter, and pursuing his never-ending quest to become a professional bowler.
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