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  • DATVF.SEALAX
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  • DATVF.PHLCHI
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  • DATVF.LAXSEA
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  • DATVF.VEU
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  • DATVF.VNU
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  • DATVF.VSU
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  • DATVF.VWU
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  • ITVI.USA
    9,836.710
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  • OTRI.USA
    4.790
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  • OTVI.USA
    9,831.280
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  • TLT.USA
    2.410
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  • WAIT.USA
    150.000
    0.000
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  • DATVF.ATLPHL
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  • DATVF.CHIATL
    1.951
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  • DATVF.DALLAX
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  • DATVF.LAXDAL
    1.501
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  • DATVF.SEALAX
    0.966
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  • DATVF.PHLCHI
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  • DATVF.LAXSEA
    2.005
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  • DATVF.VEU
    1.508
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  • DATVF.VNU
    1.395
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  • DATVF.VSU
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  • DATVF.VWU
    1.486
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  • ITVI.USA
    9,836.710
    -180.070
    -1.8%
  • OTRI.USA
    4.790
    0.100
    2.1%
  • OTVI.USA
    9,831.280
    -180.470
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  • TLT.USA
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  • WAIT.USA
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NewsToday's Pickup

Today’s Pickup: ‘Stink fruit’ cargo spoiled an Air Canada flight

Good day,

An Air Canada Rouge flight returned to Vancouver after the Boeing 767-300’s cabin filled with the odor from a shipment of durian fruit – whose odor is often compared to rotting meat.

Details from the flight on Air Canada’s (TSX:AC)  low-cost subsidiary emerged in the incident report provided to FreightWaves by the Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSBC) on October 8.  

The troubles arose shortly after the 767 took off from Vancouver International Airport on September 17 with 245 passengers and eight crew, destined for Montreal. Crew members first noticed a “strong odor” while the aircraft was at 7,000 feet above sea level, according to the TSBC report.

The flight crew leveled off at 25,000 feet to troubleshoot the problem after failing to clear the smell from the cabin. They then declared a PAN-PAN, indicating an urgent but not immediately dangerous situation, “donned their oxygen masks and returned to land” in Vancouver, the TSBC report said.

The durian shipment in the forward cargo compartment was identified as the source of the odor and removed from the flight. The aircraft then returned to service. No injuries were reported.

Did you know?

The 8,100-mile-long Yiwu-Madrid Railway line is the longest in the world, linking China and Spain. Today, the eastern Chinese city of Yiwu announced a new route to the Belgian city of Liege

Quotable: 

“We still aren’t the biggest. We don’t necessarily ever want to be.”

– AGT Global Logistics founder Angela Eliacostas, who received two awards at Women In Trucking Association’s Accelerate! Conference & Expo in Dallas.

In other news:

Irish trucking company makes carbon-zero delivery to France

An Irish firm transported a shipment of beef to France using a truck running on compressed natural gas – the first carbon-neutral delivery of its kind in Europe. (Irish Times)

Loadsmart launches freight-matching tool

Loadsmart has released a new tool to match trucks with freight, Smart Match. (TruckingInfo)

Drop in air freight demand ‘deeply concerning’

The International Air Transport Association reported a 3.9% decline in air freight in August. (Logistics Manager)

South African judge nixes firing of foreign truckers

A judge in a South African labor court ruled that a carrier that violated the rights of foreign truckers it fired. (NewsDay – Zimbabwe

Guardian truckers watch over a memorial for slain couple

Two Canadian truckers have become caretakers of a roadside memorial for a couple killed in British Columbia. (9 News – Australia

Final thoughts:

The incident aboard the Air Canada Rouge flight isn’t the first time durian has caused problems as a cargo. The smell from two metric tons led to a temporary grounding of a flight in Indonesia in November 2018. 

Needless to say, the airline probably will think twice before accepting a shipment of the prized but noxious fruit. 

Hammer down, everyone!

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Nate Tabak, Canada Correspondent

Nate Tabak is a journalist, editor and producer in Toronto. He covers Canada for FreightWaves, with a keen interest on the cross-border economic relationship with the United States. Nate spent seven years working as an investigative editor and reporter based in Kosovo. He covered everything from corruption to the country’s emerging wine industry. He also reported across the Balkans and investigated Albania’s multibillion-dollar marijuana industry with a grant from the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting. Nate grew up in Berkeley, Calif. He enjoys exploring Toronto with his wife and is always looking forward to his next meal.

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