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What will full stability regulation cost trucking?

 The introduction of full stability control systems on tractors this summer will help vehicles self-correct when a rollover or loss of control situation arises. ( Photo: Bendix Commercial Vehicle Systems )
The introduction of full stability control systems on tractors this summer will help vehicles self-correct when a rollover or loss of control situation arises. ( Photo: Bendix Commercial Vehicle Systems )

Bendix expert suggests minimal cost impact from safety technology

The seemingly never-ending run of new mandates descending on the trucking industry is causing plenty of sticker shock for those who buy trucks – especially if you haven’t bought one in a while.

Environmental Protection Agency Phase 1 Greenhouse Gas Emissions rules added some $6,200 to the base cost of a truck on average and Phase 2, which will be phased in over the next eight years, will add another $11,000 per tractor, EPA estimates. Add in the ELD mandate later this year, a potential speed limiter requirement or collision mitigation technology, and the costs can add up quickly.

Fortunately, there is one mandate upcoming that won’t be hitting fleets in the pocketbook, at least not significantly. As of Aug. 1, 2017, 6×4 tractors will be required to have full electronic stability control systems installed. The systems will be required on Class 8 motorcoaches in June 2018 and all remaining tractors and Class 7 trucks by August 2019.


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Brian Straight

Brian Straight covers general transportation news and leads the editorial team as Managing Editor. A journalism graduate of the University of Rhode Island, he has covered everything from a presidential election, to professional sports and Little League baseball, and for more than 10 years has covered trucking and logistics. Before joining FreightWaves, he was previously responsible for the editorial quality and production of Fleet Owner magazine and fleetowner.com. Brian lives in Connecticut with his wife and two kids and spends his time coaching his son’s baseball team, golfing with his daughter, and pursuing his never-ending quest to become a professional bowler.
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