• ITVI.USA
    15,462.460
    -34.260
    -0.2%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.752
    0.009
    0.3%
  • OTRI.USA
    20.670
    -0.440
    -2.1%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,437.200
    -29.190
    -0.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    3.300
    0.000
    0%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.140
    0.190
    6.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.590
    0.150
    10.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.330
    0.020
    0.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.170
    0.020
    0.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.080
    0.130
    3.3%
  • WAIT.USA
    125.000
    -1.000
    -0.8%
  • ITVI.USA
    15,462.460
    -34.260
    -0.2%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.752
    0.009
    0.3%
  • OTRI.USA
    20.670
    -0.440
    -2.1%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,437.200
    -29.190
    -0.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    3.300
    0.000
    0%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.140
    0.190
    6.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.590
    0.150
    10.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.330
    0.020
    0.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.170
    0.020
    0.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.080
    0.130
    3.3%
  • WAIT.USA
    125.000
    -1.000
    -0.8%
American ShipperShippingTrade and Compliance

Two convicted in ‘Bridgegate’ scandal

Two former aides to New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie could face 20 years in prison over their role in “Bridgegate,” which involved tying up traffic on the George Washington Bridge and in the nearby town of Fort Lee to seek revenge against the town’s mayor.

   Two former aides to New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie were convicted by a jury at a U.S. District Court in Newark, N.J. over their role in “Bridgegate,” a scheme that was concocted to snarl traffic on the George Washington Bridge and in the neighboring town of Fort Lee for several days as an act of revenge against Fort Lee’s mayor because he would not endorse Christie for reelection.
   Bill Baroni, who was Christie’s appointee as deputy executive director of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, the very agency that operates the bridge, as well as Bridget Anne Kelly, Christie’s former deputy chief of staff, were each found guilty on seven counts that included conspiracy and wire fraud.
   According to the New York Times, the two could face 20 years in prison, but the United States attorney for New Jersey, Paul J. Fishman, said before the trial his office would not recommend Kelly and Baroni serve such long sentences.
   Traffic lanes on the bridge were purposely closed in September 2013 under the guise of a “traffic study,” producing massive traffic jams.
   As the investigation into the tie-ups proceeded, and it became apparent that government officials had instigated them, the scandal became a distraction for the port authority and a blow to the morale of its employees.
   One of the largest such agencies in the country, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey not only operates bridges and tunnels connecting New Jersey and New York City, but is the landlord to the nation’s third largest port and operates a half dozen airports.
   Friday afternoon the Port Authority issued a statement which said: “This phase of the judicial process has now concluded with respect to the individuals involved. Following the sordid and troubling revelations about how the Port Authority was misused and diverted from its mission, our work toward institutionalizing agency reform will continue with renewed vigor to achieve a culture of honesty, public service, transparency and accountability. We are resolved to prevent any recurrence of events that have damaged the agency and public and unfairly besmirched our talented and professional staff.”

Chris Dupin

Chris Dupin has written about trade and transportation and other business subjects for a variety of publications before joining American Shipper and Freightwaves.

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