• ITVI.USA
    15,378.070
    -88.350
    -0.6%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.743
    0.001
    0%
  • OTRI.USA
    20.820
    0.290
    1.4%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,350.040
    -89.040
    -0.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    3.280
    -0.020
    -0.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.190
    0.050
    1.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.560
    -0.030
    -1.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.420
    0.090
    2.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.220
    0.050
    2.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.080
    0.000
    0%
  • WAIT.USA
    126.000
    1.000
    0.8%
  • ITVI.USA
    15,378.070
    -88.350
    -0.6%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.743
    0.001
    0%
  • OTRI.USA
    20.820
    0.290
    1.4%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,350.040
    -89.040
    -0.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    3.280
    -0.020
    -0.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.190
    0.050
    1.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.560
    -0.030
    -1.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.420
    0.090
    2.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.220
    0.050
    2.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.080
    0.000
    0%
  • WAIT.USA
    126.000
    1.000
    0.8%
American ShipperShippingTrade and Compliance

U.S. Chamber launches U.S.-Mexico Economic Council

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce this week started the U.S.-Mexico Economic Council, an organization that will work to improve economic and commercial partnerships between the two countries.

   The U.S. Chamber of Commerce this week started the U.S.-Mexico Economic Council, an organization that will work to improve economic and commercial partnerships between the two countries.
   The U.S.-Mexico Economic Council (USMXECO) will serve as “a platform for both countries’ private sectors to work together in the creation of innovative solutions to shared policy challenges, all in the name of boosting growth and creating good jobs in the United States and across North America,” the chamber said. 
   The timing of the council’s formation is also important to companies on both sides of the border as the Trump administration gears up to renegotiate aspects of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) with its counterparts in Mexico and Canada.
   The council’s formation originates from the U.S.-Mexico CEO Dialogue, which was established in 2013 by the U.S. Chamber and the Consejo Coordinador Empresarial (CCE) as a bilateral private sector forum to discuss key economic and trade issues that impact the relationship between the two countries.
   “The economic fates of the U.S. and Mexico are linked, and today, we are optimistic about the future of our relationship and the competitiveness of North America,” Chamber CEO Tom Donohue, said in a statement. The fruits of [the June 7] discussions, coupled with the important work this new council will undertake, will help to drive even more growth and fortify our economic relationship for the long term.”
   The U.S.-Mexico Economic Council is the U.S. Chamber’s 15th bilateral business council. It is comprised of dozens of companies from a range of industries and sectors of the economy.

Chris Gillis

Located in the Washington, D.C. area, Chris Gillis primarily reports on regulatory and legislative topics that impact cross-border trade. He joined American Shipper in 1994, shortly after graduating from Mount St. Mary’s College in Emmitsburg, Md., with a degree in international business and economics.

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