• ITVI.USA
    15,845.180
    -15.980
    -0.1%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.806
    0.013
    0.5%
  • OTRI.USA
    21.590
    0.130
    0.6%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,846.760
    -20.840
    -0.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.950
    -0.570
    -16.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.610
    0.650
    22%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.370
    -0.240
    -14.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.550
    0.210
    6.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.320
    0.220
    10.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.110
    0.250
    6.5%
  • WAIT.USA
    126.000
    0.000
    0%
  • ITVI.USA
    15,845.180
    -15.980
    -0.1%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.806
    0.013
    0.5%
  • OTRI.USA
    21.590
    0.130
    0.6%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,846.760
    -20.840
    -0.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.950
    -0.570
    -16.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.610
    0.650
    22%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.370
    -0.240
    -14.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.550
    0.210
    6.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.320
    0.220
    10.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.110
    0.250
    6.5%
  • WAIT.USA
    126.000
    0.000
    0%
American ShipperShippingTrade and Compliance

U.S. pork, beef exports start cooking in March

As West Coast port congestion started easing after new dock labor contract agreement, meat shippers found it easier to export to Asian buyers.

   The U.S. Meat Export Federation said exports of pork and beef showed increases in March after a slow start to the year.
   Although March pork exports were down 9 percent compared the same month last year, USMEF noted that the export volume was the largest in 11 months at 191,041 metric tons. The export value of these pork exports was $495.3 million, down 18 percent year-over-year, but up 5 percent from February.
   March beef exports totaled 86,774 metric tons, down 7 percent from a year ago but also 5 percent increase over February. These exports were valued at $527.3 million, up 2 percent year-over-year but down slightly from February, according to USMEF.
   The trade group said some relief from the West Coast port congestion in March helped boosts export volumes of U.S. pork and beef.
   “Port congestion remained an issue well into March – and even into April in the Southern California ports – but the announcement of the new labor contract certainly improved the business climate,” said USMEF President and Chief Executive Officer Philip Seng in a statement. “After months of frustration, the U.S. meat industry was finally able to reassure Asian buyers that the worst of the crisis was behind us and that they could once again count on the U.S. to fulfill its role as a reliable supplier. 
   “This was especially important for customers purchasing chilled pork and beef, which require very prompt delivery due to product shelf life,” he added. 
   U.S. pork and beef exporters have watched their market share in some countries erode due to large volumes of lower priced products from other supplying countries. Market access barriers remain in some key markets, such as China and Russia. 
   “Closure of the Russian market to European pork continues to impact all major pork suppliers, as the EU has focused very aggressively on alternative markets in Asia,” Seng said. “In the beef complex, the projected slowdown in Australia’s production may still be coming, but certainly did not materialize in the first quarter.”

Chris Gillis

Located in the Washington, D.C. area, Chris Gillis primarily reports on regulatory and legislative topics that impact cross-border trade. He joined American Shipper in 1994, shortly after graduating from Mount St. Mary’s College in Emmitsburg, Md., with a degree in international business and economics.

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