• ITVI.USA
    15,763.080
    545.430
    3.6%
  • OTRI.USA
    26.620
    -0.360
    -1.3%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,745.960
    569.240
    3.8%
  • TLT.USA
    2.530
    -0.020
    -0.8%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.850
    0.220
    8.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.310
    0.440
    15.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.400
    0.050
    3.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    2.670
    0.660
    32.8%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.120
    0.240
    12.8%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.070
    0.300
    10.8%
  • WAIT.USA
    125.000
    -2.000
    -1.6%
  • ITVI.USA
    15,763.080
    545.430
    3.6%
  • OTRI.USA
    26.620
    -0.360
    -1.3%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,745.960
    569.240
    3.8%
  • TLT.USA
    2.530
    -0.020
    -0.8%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.850
    0.220
    8.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.310
    0.440
    15.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.400
    0.050
    3.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    2.670
    0.660
    32.8%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.120
    0.240
    12.8%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.070
    0.300
    10.8%
  • WAIT.USA
    125.000
    -2.000
    -1.6%
American ShipperTrade and Compliance

Univar shells out $62.5 million for antidumping evasion

The Justice Department said the Illinois company imported 36 shipments of Chinese-origin saccharin that were transshipped through Taiwan to evade paying antidumping duties.

   The U.S. Justice Department on Tuesday said Univar USA, based in Downers Grove, Ill., agreed to pay $62.5 million to settle allegations that it imported 36 shipments of Chinese-origin saccharin that were transshipped through Taiwan between 2007 and 2012 to avoid a 329 percent antidumping duty.
   The transshipments resulted in the evasion of about $36 million in antidumping duties by Univar, the Justice Department said.
   The settlement resolves a lawsuit brought in the U.S. Court of International Trade seeking recovery of unpaid antidumping duties and penalties totaling $84 million plus interest. In that action, the government alleged that Univar was “grossly negligent or negligent” in failing to determine that its supplier in Taiwan was not a manufacturer but, instead, imported saccharin into Taiwan from China for transshipment to the United States. 
   The recovery is considered the largest amount reached under 19 U.S. Code, section 1592 in the Court of International Trade. 

Chris Gillis

Located in the Washington, D.C. area, Chris Gillis primarily reports on regulatory and legislative topics that impact cross-border trade. He joined American Shipper in 1994, shortly after graduating from Mount St. Mary’s College in Emmitsburg, Md., with a degree in international business and economics.