• DATVF.VWU
    1.570
    0.029
    1.9%
  • DATVF.LAXDAL
    1.584
    0.040
    2.6%
  • DATVF.DALLAX
    0.864
    0.024
    2.9%
  • DATVF.PHLCHI
    0.948
    0.025
    2.7%
  • DATVF.LAXSEA
    2.030
    -0.025
    -1.2%
  • DATVF.SEALAX
    1.110
    0.084
    8.2%
  • DATVF.VEU
    1.507
    0.019
    1.3%
  • DATVF.ATLPHL
    1.642
    0.002
    0.1%
  • DATVF.VSU
    1.224
    0.032
    2.7%
  • DATVF.CHIATL
    1.932
    0.031
    1.6%
  • DATVF.VNU
    1.434
    0.027
    1.9%
  • ITVI.USA
    9,884.260
    76.830
    0.8%
  • OTRI.USA
    6.160
    0.460
    8.1%
  • OTVI.USA
    9,876.200
    74.110
    0.8%
  • TLT.USA
    2.570
    0.000
    0%
  • WAIT.USA
    150.000
    0.000
    0%
  • DATVF.VWU
    1.570
    0.029
    1.9%
  • DATVF.LAXDAL
    1.584
    0.040
    2.6%
  • DATVF.DALLAX
    0.864
    0.024
    2.9%
  • DATVF.PHLCHI
    0.948
    0.025
    2.7%
  • DATVF.LAXSEA
    2.030
    -0.025
    -1.2%
  • DATVF.SEALAX
    1.110
    0.084
    8.2%
  • DATVF.VEU
    1.507
    0.019
    1.3%
  • DATVF.ATLPHL
    1.642
    0.002
    0.1%
  • DATVF.VSU
    1.224
    0.032
    2.7%
  • DATVF.CHIATL
    1.932
    0.031
    1.6%
  • DATVF.VNU
    1.434
    0.027
    1.9%
  • ITVI.USA
    9,884.260
    76.830
    0.8%
  • OTRI.USA
    6.160
    0.460
    8.1%
  • OTVI.USA
    9,876.200
    74.110
    0.8%
  • TLT.USA
    2.570
    0.000
    0%
  • WAIT.USA
    150.000
    0.000
    0%
Company earningsLess than TruckloadNews

YRC’s regional business goes ugly in quarter: Operating ratio spikes hard in across-the-board weakness

Long-haul unit holds own in weak macro climate

Time was that YRC Worldwide’s regional less-than-truckload (LTL) businesses were the tail that wagged the corporate dog, and its long-haul unit, YRC Freight, was the sick pup. Judging by YRC’s third-quarter results reported on Oct. 31, the roles have been somewhat reversed.

For the company’s three regional operators–New Penn, Holland and Reddaway–the quarter was an across-the-board mess. Operating ratio spiked to nearly 101% from 96.2% in the year-earlier period, meaning the units spent more than they generated in revenue. Daily shipments fell 3.9% year-over-year, daily tonnage fell 3.6%, and revenue for each hundred pounds hauled, a key measure of productivity, fell 0.8%, a figure that included fuel surcharge revenue. Excluding the impacts of fuel surcharges, regional revenue per hundredweight was flat and LTL revenue per shipment increased 0.3%. Operating revenue declined by 5.8%, while operating income swung to a $4.1 million loss from an $18.4 million gain.

The long-haul unit, which has been in business triage for more than a decade, did not fold its tent amid a continued lousy environment for industrial freight demand, though it hardly produced barn-burning numbers. Revenue fell 2.3%, but operating income rose 28%, the best quarterly year-over-year performance in 10 years. Operating ratio declined slightly to 96.1% from 97%. Daily LTL tonnage fell 4% but total tonnage actually rose, a reflection of heavier weighted truckload business being brokered by YRC’s HNRY Logistics unit. Daily shipments fell 3.5% while revenue per hundred pounds hauled increased slightly.

In all, YRC reported a 48 cents per share third quarter net loss, most of which came from an $11.2 million loss associated with the mid-September refinancing of a $600 million term loan. Backing out the 34 cents per share net loss from that event, the per share loss of 14  cents was better than the 17 cents per share net loss expected from the handful of analysts polled by Barchart. 

The refinancing agreement extended the original July 2022 maturity date to June 2024, eliminated a 3% annual hit on principal amortization that the company said will save $18 million annually, and cut YRC’s interest rate by 100 basis points.

Operating revenue came in at $1.26 billion, compared to $1.30 billion in the year-earlier quarter. Operating income dropped to $23.8 million from $41.2 million. Both periods included net losses on disposals of property.

The third-quarter total net loss figure compared with $2.9 million net income in the third quarter of 2018, the company said. YRC generated $18.3 million less earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) in the 2019 quarter than it did in the prior-year period.

Near the close of trading, YRC shares were priced at $3.34, down 45 cents a share.

On the analyst call following the release of the results, YRC executives tried to frame the regionals’ poor results as situational and transitory. Besides suffering from the weak macro trends impacting all LTL carriers, very weak Midwest traffic, lower auto sales, and the impact of the United Auto Workers’ strike against General Motors Corp., (NYSE:GM), all conspired to undermine results, particularly at Holland, the company’s Midwest regional operation, according to executives.

The regional units have also not been able to adequately leverage the operating efficiencies built into the five-year collective bargaining agreement reached earlier this year with the Teamsters union, whereas the long-haul unit has, Darren Hawkins, YRC’s CEO, said on the company’s call with analysts. Hawkins said the benefits of the contract language for regionals was predicated on a top-line growth environment which has yet to materialize.

All told, operating revenue came in at $1.26 billion, compared to $1.30 billion in the year-earlier quarter. Operating income dropped to $23.8 million from $41.2 million. Both periods included net losses on disposals of property.

The third-quarter total net loss figure compared with $2.9 million net income in the third quarter of 2018, the company said. YRC generated $18.3 million less earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) in the 2019 quarter than it did in the prior-year period.

All told, operating revenue came in at $1.26 billion, compared to $1.30 billion in the year-earlier quarter. Operating income dropped to $23.8 million from $41.2 million. Both periods included net losses on disposals of property.

The third-quarter total net loss figure compared with $2.9 million net income in the third quarter of 2018, the company said. YRC generated $18.3 million less earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) in the 2019 quarter than it did in the prior-year period.

In an efficiency drive, YRC has consolidated 12 service centers so far this year, and plans to combine or shutter 13 more by year’s end. It plans to close or consolidate 25 more next year, executives said. The company recently expanded its service in Texas by launching one-day deliveries throughout the state.

According to executives, box trucks operated in local cartage service by employees not holding commercial drivers licenses has saved the company $12,600 per month for each truck over the use of more costly outsourced transportation. The ability to insource the operation was part of the recent Teamster labor contract.

YRC said contract renewals rose by 3%, on average, in the quarter for its regional and national units.

Tags
Show More

Mark Solomon

Formerly the Executive Editor at DC Velocity, Mark Solomon joined FreightWaves as Managing Editor of Freight Markets. Solomon began his journalistic career in 1982 at Traffic World magazine, ran his own public relations firm (Media Based Solutions) from 1994 to 2008, and has been at DC Velocity since then. Over the course of his career, Solomon has covered nearly the whole gamut of the transportation and logistics industry, including trucking, railroads, maritime, 3PLs, and regulatory issues. Solomon witnessed and narrated the rise of Amazon and XPO Logistics and the shift of the U.S. Postal Service from a mail-focused service to parcel, as well as the exponential, e-commerce-driven growth of warehouse square footage and omnichannel fulfillment.

5 Comments

  1. This so called holding company. They have done nothing but rune so very good Trucking Companys In my opinion they have done nothing but try to break the union. The people that hold stock in this needs to rethink there investment. THIS IS JUST MY OPINION .

  2. Former employee here – the company made the numbers on the regionals look good for years, trying to make them attractive to potential buyers & put all of the loses into YRC Freight. Not sure what the strategy is now, except to shrink & shrink until there is nothing left.

  3. Don’t forget that all the sales force and the routing of shipments is controlled by YRC. Making sure the most profitable freight gets put on YRC trucks is an easy way to swing the OR. In 10 months after taking over Holland Zollars changed the OR from 94 to 102 as an excuse to close Holland. Plans were in place to close Holland until a couple of top guys talked him out of it.
    New Penn has always been extremely profitable until YRC started managing them.

  4. Will they ever make it the current state? This was all due to trying to buy their competitors.

  5. What a sham! YRC executives should be in jail! They are just as bad as a Crooked politician! They took two of the best LTL companies and destroyed them and now they have audacity to claim they are loosing money. They couldn’t make money if you gave it to them , as did the 25,000 plus workers that sacrificed millions of dollars and the executives rewarded themselves with stock and bonuses for 10 years. Don’t be a fool and buy the stock!!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Close