• ITVI.USA
    15,462.460
    -34.260
    -0.2%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.752
    0.009
    0.3%
  • OTRI.USA
    20.670
    -0.440
    -2.1%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,437.200
    -29.190
    -0.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    3.300
    0.000
    0%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.140
    0.190
    6.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.590
    0.150
    10.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.330
    0.020
    0.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.170
    0.020
    0.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.080
    0.130
    3.3%
  • WAIT.USA
    125.000
    -1.000
    -0.8%
  • ITVI.USA
    15,462.460
    -34.260
    -0.2%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.752
    0.009
    0.3%
  • OTRI.USA
    20.670
    -0.440
    -2.1%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,437.200
    -29.190
    -0.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    3.300
    0.000
    0%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.140
    0.190
    6.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.590
    0.150
    10.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.330
    0.020
    0.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.170
    0.020
    0.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.080
    0.130
    3.3%
  • WAIT.USA
    125.000
    -1.000
    -0.8%
American Shipper

Boston sees 12% rise in first half container volume

Boston sees 12% rise in first half container volume

   The port of Boston increased its container traffic 12 percent in the first six months of this year to 83,443 TEUs from 74,538 TEUs in January-June 2003.

   Measured in tons, containerized traffic through the Massachusetts Port Authority’s Conley container terminal rose 17 percent to 643,073 tons from 551,073 tons in the first half of last year.

   Export tonnage jumped 20 percent to 227,554 tons, helping to provide a better balance between outbound and inbound traffic. Since a direct Asia/U.S. East Coast container service from Boston began two years ago, the ratio of imports to exports has narrowed from 2.5:1 to 1.6:1, the port reported.

   One of Boston’s largest export commodities is forest products, including timber and waste paper.

   “Waste paper is often recycled overseas where it is made into cardboard boxes or packing material and used to ship imported goods to the west,” the port said.

   Mike Leone, director for the port of Boston, attributed the increase in container traffic to additional liner services and a generally healthy economy.

   Two years ago, the alliance of COSCO, “K” Line, Yang Ming and Hanjin Shipping began direct inbound service to the port of Boston. Last year, Mediterranean Shipping Co. also expanded service at the port by adding an additional weekly vessel. MSC calls Boston with direct inbound service from northern Europe and from the Mediterranean.

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