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  • OTRI.USA
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  • OTVI.USA
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  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
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Canc?n agreement won?t brake transport emissions

Canc·n agreement wonÆt brake transport emissions

   The International Transport Forum, a think tank at the Paris-based Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, said the climate change agreement reached in Canc'n will not increase pressure on the transport sector to reduce its carbon dioxide emissions.

   'The Cancun Agreements decided at COP 16 may have given new impetus to a stalled U.N. negotiating process, but will have no direct impact on continued global growth of transport CO2 emissions,' said Jack Short secretary general of the International Transport Forum, in a statement.

   According to the OECD, transport is responsible for 23 percent of global CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion.

   Short warned that political pressure is not at a sufficient level among many countries to reduce transport-related emissions. 'In some cases it may indeed wane. In practice, carbon constraints will likely not become a defining factor for transport policy for several more years,' he said.

   'Crucially, lack of progress in Canc'n and the postponement of emission trading schemes in the USA and Australia means we are moving away from setting an international framework for pricing carbon,' Short said. 'For international shipping and aviation that are contemplating global market-based measures, this will translate into an increase in the cost of decarbonization.' ' Chris Gillis

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