• ITVI.USA
    13,809.570
    -6.010
    0%
  • OTRI.USA
    21.480
    0.000
    0%
  • OTVI.USA
    13,784.050
    -7.950
    -0.1%
  • TLT.USA
    2.810
    0.000
    0%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.480
    -0.170
    -6.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.070
    -0.210
    -6.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.370
    -0.090
    -6.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    2.280
    -0.210
    -8.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.900
    -0.070
    -3.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    2.720
    -0.270
    -9%
  • WAIT.USA
    127.000
    0.000
    0%
  • ITVI.USA
    13,809.570
    -6.010
    0%
  • OTRI.USA
    21.480
    0.000
    0%
  • OTVI.USA
    13,784.050
    -7.950
    -0.1%
  • TLT.USA
    2.810
    0.000
    0%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.480
    -0.170
    -6.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.070
    -0.210
    -6.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.370
    -0.090
    -6.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    2.280
    -0.210
    -8.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.900
    -0.070
    -3.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    2.720
    -0.270
    -9%
  • WAIT.USA
    127.000
    0.000
    0%
American Shipper

Changes in manifest filings coming Jan. 1 in China

Changes in manifest filings coming Jan. 1 in China

Chinese Customs is making changes to advanced manifest requirements beginning Jan. 1, changes that will require shippers and carriers to file manifests a day before a ship headed to China leaves from its port of departure, according to a note disseminated by the Chinese shipping line COSCO to its customers.

   The ruling, made in September, could have a profound impact on carrier-shipper data exchange for China-bound shipments.

   “We have recently been advised that a new regulation will come into effect as from the 1st of January 2009 whereby all cargo bound for China will be subject to the 24 hours advance manifest rule in accordance with the Chinese Custom ruling No. 172,” the note said. “(The) aforementioned rule provides that carriers undertaking shipments to China must submit manifest details to Chinese Customs 24 hours before vessel ETA (estimated time of arrival) at the port of loading. Upon screening of manifest data received, the Chinese Customs will advise back to the carrier whether or not the cargo can be allowed into China. Only if Customs feedback/response is positive, (will) cargo be accepted on board. Under no circumstance (will) the carrier be allowed to load cargo on board if (the) manifest filing is rejected by Chinese Customs.

   “As you can appreciate this new regulation will have a massive impact on the way shipping lines and customers are presently handling their documentation and operations for shipments bound for China. Both parties (the shipping line and its clients) will be forced to adjust their internal workflow in order to meet the different time scale required by the introduction of the new 24-hour advance manifest rule. One of the key aspects is that exporters/customers will be asked to provide manifest details/shipping instructions well ahead to allow the shipping line to meet the 24 hours advance manifest requirement.”

   In September, logistics company BDP International pointed out the rule change, saying the major difference will be that manifests are now due 24 hours prior to the vessel loading at the departure port. Previously, Chinese Customs had only required the manifest to be filed 48 hours before arrival at the port of discharge.

   BDP said the ruling impacts airfreight shipments as well.

   “All air freight carriers will be required to submit their full shipment manifests (electronically) that has an ETA of less than four hours from the departure point prior to departure,” the company said. “For air freight that has an ETA of greater than four hours from the departure point, the manifest must be submitted prior to the arrival at the first port in China.”