• ITVI.USA
    14,347.600
    105.650
    0.7%
  • OTRI.USA
    22.380
    -0.310
    -1.4%
  • OTVI.USA
    14,344.040
    98.760
    0.7%
  • TLT.USA
    2.760
    0.020
    0.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.650
    -0.300
    -10.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.970
    0.010
    0.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    2.990
    -0.310
    -9.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    2.490
    -0.200
    -7.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.460
    -0.040
    -2.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.280
    -0.100
    -3%
  • WAIT.USA
    127.000
    0.000
    0%
  • ITVI.USA
    14,347.600
    105.650
    0.7%
  • OTRI.USA
    22.380
    -0.310
    -1.4%
  • OTVI.USA
    14,344.040
    98.760
    0.7%
  • TLT.USA
    2.760
    0.020
    0.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.650
    -0.300
    -10.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.970
    0.010
    0.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    2.990
    -0.310
    -9.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    2.490
    -0.200
    -7.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.460
    -0.040
    -2.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.280
    -0.100
    -3%
  • WAIT.USA
    127.000
    0.000
    0%
American ShipperWarehouse

Container cargo grows 10% at Port of Charleston

The South Carolina Ports Authority is also investing in 120 more reefer racks at its Wando Welch Terminal.

   The Port of Charleston enjoyed 10 percent growth in container volumes in 2015, ending the year with 1.97 million TEUs.
   It was the second consecutive year of double-digit growth for Charleston, thanks to the port’s ability to recruit discretionary cargo and the continued growth of shipments for the automotive sector. But the South Carolina Ports Authority warned that growth would be flat to modest over the next six months due to economic weakness in overseas markets. The delay in completion of the Panama Canal expansion until later this year means that larger vessels that could consolidate more cargo for a Charleston stop won’t be arriving until 2017, Port Director Jim Newsome said in a statement.
   The ports of Charleston and Georgetown handled 1.34 million tons of cargo last year and finished vehicle volumes grew 13 percent to 268,964 units, according to the port authority.
   Charleston recently added a new regular roll-on/roll-off (ro-ro) service from Atlantic Ro-Ro Carriers at its Columbus Street Terminal. The first ARRC vessel arrived Jan. 8, handling about 6,000 tons of import cargo. ARRC added Charleston to its Balt-Atlantic Service, which connects St. Petersburg, Russia, and Northern European ports with East Coast ports.
   The Inland Port in Greer handled 7,824 rail moves in December, more than double the facility’s volume in December 2014. Rail volume in Greer grew 76.5 percent during its second full calendar year of operation, with 75,111 total rail moves completed.
   Charleston is on track for a major harbor deepening to accommodate the next generation of vessels, with the project receiving final approval from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in September and being referred to Congress for funding authorization in the future.
   Meanwhile, the port authority board approved two contracts for concept design and additional construction pertaining to the containment wall for the new container terminal being built at the old Charleston Navy base. The facility will increase Charleston’s capacity by 50 percent, with the first phase expected to open by 2020.
   To accommodate rapid growth in refrigerated container shipments, the board also approved a $4.7 million contract for installation of four racks of plug-in, refrigerated container racks at the Wando Welch Terminal. The racks will have space and electric power for 120 containers.
   Charleston has experienced 38 percent growth in refrigerated cargo since 2011.
   Private investment in cold storage facilities has been rapidly increased in the Charleston area during the past year. New Orleans Cold Storage in November completed an 81,000-square foot expansion of its existing facility, while Agro Merchants recently added a facility and Lineage Logistics is building a refrigerated warehouse that is expected to open this summer.