• ITVI.USA
    15,868.670
    8.820
    0.1%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.774
    0.001
    0%
  • OTRI.USA
    21.470
    0.010
    0%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,873.680
    8.980
    0.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    2.960
    -0.660
    -18.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.100
    -0.250
    -10.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.610
    0.250
    18.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.340
    -0.130
    -3.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.860
    -0.220
    -5.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    3.520
    0.380
    12.1%
  • WAIT.USA
    126.000
    -2.000
    -1.6%
  • ITVI.USA
    15,868.670
    8.820
    0.1%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.774
    0.001
    0%
  • OTRI.USA
    21.470
    0.010
    0%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,873.680
    8.980
    0.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    2.960
    -0.660
    -18.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.100
    -0.250
    -10.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.610
    0.250
    18.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.340
    -0.130
    -3.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.860
    -0.220
    -5.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    3.520
    0.380
    12.1%
  • WAIT.USA
    126.000
    -2.000
    -1.6%
InsightsNewsWeather and Critical Events

Dangerous heat, humidity linger from Midwest to Gulf Coast

It will feel like 105 degrees or hotter in many areas

It will feel like a sauna outside as the heat index exceeds 105 degrees Tuesday in more than a dozen states.

The combination of high heat and oppressive humidity began reaching dangerous levels over the weekend, spreading from the Midwest to the Gulf Coast.

While temperature may not be record-breaking, highs will hit well into the 90s to around 100 degrees in southeastern South Dakota; the southern half of Iowa; most of Illinois and Indiana; far southern Michigan; northwestern Ohio; western Kentucky; far western Tennessee; much of Mississippi, Arkansas and Louisiana; as well as eastern portions of Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas and Nebraska. The National Weather Service has issued heat advisories for all of these places.

Add the abundant humidity and the heat index will range from 100 to 109 in the advisory areas. Of particular concern are western Mississippi, northeastern Louisiana and southeastern Arkansas where an excessive heat warning is in place. While the advisory shouldn’t be taken lightly, the warning should be taken even more seriously. The heat index in the warning areas could reach 110 to 115 degrees.

In these conditions, the ability for a driver’s body to cool itself is challenged. When the body heats too rapidly to cool itself properly, or when too much fluid or salt is lost through dehydration or sweating, body temperature rises and a driver may experience a heat-related illness.

All drivers should be sure their rigs are in good condition so their air conditioning, or their trucks themselves, don’t break down. Heat safety tips are available here.

Lanes of concern

Interstate 80 from Grand Island, Nebraska, to Toledo, Ohio
Interstate 29 from Vermillion, South Dakota, to Kansas City, Missouri
Interstate 70 from Topeka, Kansas, to Indianapolis
Interstate 40 from Fort Smith, Arkansas, to Memphis, Tennessee
Interstate 20 from Monroe, Louisiana, to Jackson, Mississippi
Interstate 10 from Lafayette, Louisiana, to Pensacola, Florida
Interstate 55 from Memphis to Pontiac, Illinois

Click here for more FreightWaves articles by Nick Austin.

You might also like:

Long view: Preparing logistically for extreme weather

Top 5 US spots for truck-animal collisions

Hot Shots: Fierce fires, ferocious floods, train derailments and more

Nick Austin, Director of Weather Analytics and Senior Meteorologist

In his nearly 20 years of weather forecasting experience, Nick worked on air at WBBJ-TV and WRCB-TV, including time spent doing weather analysis and field reporting. He received his Bachelor of Science in Meteorology from Florida State University as well as a Bachelor of Science in Management from Georgia Institute of Technology. Nick is also a member of the American Meteorological Society and National Weather Association. As a member of the weather team at WBBJ-TV in Jackson, Tennessee, Nick was nominated for a Mid-South Emmy for live coverage of a major tornado outbreak in 2008. As part of the weather team at WRCB-TV in Chattanooga, Tennessee, Nick shared the Chattanooga Times-Free Press Best of the Best award for “Best Weather Team” for eight consecutive years. Nick earned his National Weather Association Broadcasting Seal in 2005.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

We are glad you’re enjoying the content

Sign up for a free FreightWaves account today for unlimited access to all of our latest content

By signing in for the first time, I give consent for FreightWaves to send me event updates and news. I can unsubscribe from these emails at any time. For more information please see our Privacy Policy.