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  • OTLT.USA
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  • OTRI.USA
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  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
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American Shipper

Galveston signs agreement with Cuba

Galveston signs agreement with Cuba

   The Port of Galveston signed a memorandum of understanding December 17 with Alimport, Cuba’s single largest importer of food supplies, to secure food for the 11 million residents of Cuba.

   “Agricultural commodities have always been a strong part of Galveston’s cargo mix and an important part of the port’s exports.    Cuba is a natural market for Texas products and for Port of Galveston exports because of our proximity to the Gulf and to Cuba,” said Steven M. Cernak, Port Director.

   The agreement between the Port of Galveston and Alimport calls for the utilization of port facilities for the movement of U.S. licensed cargoes, especially food and agricultural and forest products to Cuba.    The expansion of products through the port is concentrated on increased movements of wheat, corn, rice and other grain products and cotton.    The agreement shall be in effect for two years and may be renewed on an annual basis.

   The first cargo of wheat shipped to Cuba in over forty years was shipped from the Port of Galveston in January 2002.

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