• ITVI.USA
    15,415.310
    54.710
    0.4%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.761
    -0.007
    -0.3%
  • OTRI.USA
    21.110
    -0.300
    -1.4%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,387.520
    55.710
    0.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    3.300
    0.000
    0%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.140
    0.190
    6.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.590
    0.150
    10.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.330
    0.020
    0.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.170
    0.020
    0.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.080
    0.130
    3.3%
  • WAIT.USA
    125.000
    -1.000
    -0.8%
  • ITVI.USA
    15,415.310
    54.710
    0.4%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.761
    -0.007
    -0.3%
  • OTRI.USA
    21.110
    -0.300
    -1.4%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,387.520
    55.710
    0.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    3.300
    0.000
    0%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.140
    0.190
    6.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.590
    0.150
    10.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.330
    0.020
    0.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.170
    0.020
    0.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.080
    0.130
    3.3%
  • WAIT.USA
    125.000
    -1.000
    -0.8%
American ShipperShipping

Great Lakes limestone up in June

Limestone shipments on the Great Lakes increased in June compared to May and last year, but ice seasons are still a major concern, according to the Lakes Carriers’ Association.

   Limestone shipments on the Great Lakes totaled 4,042,766 tons in June, up 6 percent from May and up 9 percent year-over-year, the Lakes Carriers’ Association said in a statement.
   Year-to-date limestone shipments on the lakes stand at 9.9 million tons, a year-over-year increase of 24.4 percent.
   United States quarries shipped 3.3 million tons on the lakes in June, while Canadian quarries shipped 765,000 tons, a year-over-year increase of 6.8 percent and 21 percent, respectively.
   Ice was extremely thick on the lakes in Spring 2014, which had a strong negative impact on limestone and other cargo trade. Cancelled and delayed cargo from the past two ice seasons has cost the region an estimated 5,800 jobs and $1.1 billion in economic activity, according to the LCA.
    The LCA has previously asked Congress to examine the possibility of sending a second heavy-icebreaking vessel to the Great Lakes to help offset the damage cause by harsh winter weather and ice the past two years. The United States Senate’s fiscal 2016 Homeland Security Appropriations bill directs the U.S. Coast Guard to conduct a study within 180 days of the bill’s enactment to determine required assets needed to keep cargo moving throughout the ice season. The bill also includes the consideration of another Mackinaw-Class icebreaker on the lakes, which would cost around $151 million.
   The 240-foot USCGC Mackinaw, out of Cheboygan, Mich. is the only heavy icebreaker currently stationed on the Great Lakes.
   The U.S. Coast Guard has six, 140-foot Bay-Class icebreakers stationed on the Great Lakes capable of medium icebreaking. These vessels include the USCGC Biscayne Bay out of St. Ignace, Mich.; the USCGC Katmai Bay out of Sault Ste. Marie, Mich.; the USCGC Bristol Bay out of Detroit, Mich.; the USCGC Mobile Bay out of Sturgeon Bay, Wis.; and the USCGC Morro Bay and USCGC Neah Bay, both based out of Cleveland, Ohio.
   In addition, the U.S. Coast Guard has two, 225-foot Juniper-Class buoy tenders on the Great Lakes with light icebreaking capabilities, the USCGC Alder out of Duluth, Minn. and USCGC Hollyhock, out of Port Huron, Mich.

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