• ITVI.USA
    16,240.330
    -110.510
    -0.7%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.762
    0.031
    1.1%
  • OTRI.USA
    21.780
    0.120
    0.6%
  • OTVI.USA
    16,233.310
    -109.890
    -0.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    3.520
    0.380
    12.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    2.960
    -0.660
    -18.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.610
    0.250
    18.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.340
    -0.130
    -3.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.100
    -0.250
    -10.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.860
    -0.220
    -5.4%
  • WAIT.USA
    126.000
    -2.000
    -1.6%
  • ITVI.USA
    16,240.330
    -110.510
    -0.7%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.762
    0.031
    1.1%
  • OTRI.USA
    21.780
    0.120
    0.6%
  • OTVI.USA
    16,233.310
    -109.890
    -0.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    3.520
    0.380
    12.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    2.960
    -0.660
    -18.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.610
    0.250
    18.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.340
    -0.130
    -3.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.100
    -0.250
    -10.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.860
    -0.220
    -5.4%
  • WAIT.USA
    126.000
    -2.000
    -1.6%
American Shipper

IATA: Cargo demand rises slightly

   Global air cargo demand rose by 1.2 percent in June, year over year, showing steady improvement from a 0.9 percent rise in May, according to the International Air Transport Association.
   Capacity rose 2.7 percent, year over year.
   So far this year, cargo demand has expanded 0.1 percent, but capacity has ticked up 1 percent.
   Freight rose 0.8 percent between May and June due in large part to a 0.9 percent improvement seen by European airlines over the same period. European demand was up 2.6 percent when compared to June 2012. 
   Middle Eastern, Latin American and African airlines all experienced demand growth in June, seeing rises of 12.7 percent, 7 percent and 2.4 percent, respectively. North American and Asian airlines both saw declines, with cargo demand falling 1.2 percent and 1.8 percent, respectively.
   Despite some seemingly good news, officials noted that business confidence is still flat overall and export orders are on the decline. With the continued loss of cargo demand out of Asia-Pacific, air cargo still isn’t primed for a turnaround.
   “It’s too early to tell if June was a positive turning point after 18 months of stagnation. Air freight volumes are at their highest since mid-2011, but that good news needs to be tempered with a dose of reality,” IATA’s chief executive officer, Tony Tyler, said in a statement. “The global economic environment remains weak, and the basis for the acceleration of air cargo growth in June appears to be fragile.” – Jon Ross

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