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American Shipper

Lloyd’s Register joins project to build world’s largest sailing cargo ship

The project, launched by Hamburg, Germany-based Sailing Cargo, aims to build a wind-propelled, 558-foot car carrier that could transport 1,700 to 2,000 automobiles.

   The Quadriga sustainable shipping project – an initiative to build the world’s biggest sailing cargo ship – has added a new partner: engineering and technical services organization Lloyd’s Register.
   The project, which was launched by Hamburg, Germany-based Sailing Cargo, aims to build a 170-meter (about 558-foot) car carrier that could carry 1,700 to 2,000 cars.
   Lloyd’s Register’s role will to be to help to ensure compliance with technical, safety and environmental standards through consultancy during the design and specification stage, as well as onsite construction supervision. LR said it will also verify whether the projected performance parameters have been met.
   Proponents say wind-assisted propulsion is a realistic option for introducing renewable power into shipping. A Lloyd’s Register low carbon pathways study found that low carbon ships need to enter the fleet by 2030 for shipping to reduce its emissions in line with the Paris Agreement.
   The question, however, is whether the technology can be available on the scale needed to achieve the required level of reduction.
   The project vessel, according to Sailing Cargo, would be equipped with four DynaRig masts and operate on hybrid propulsion with sails and diesel-electric engines, as well as have an optional battery system for peak loads.
   The vessel would be capable of sailing at 10-12 knots, with the aim of reaching 14-16 knots in the next few years, designers say. 
   “It’s a very exciting initiative to be involved in,” Lloyd’s Marine & Offshore Marketing and Sales Manager Nico Dettmann said. “It’s always motivating for us to be involved from the concept stage of any project, especially those that involve innovative technology and new ways of doing things.”

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