• ITVI.USA
    11,095.550
    -126.500
    -1.1%
  • OTRI.USA
    15.880
    -0.310
    -1.9%
  • OTVI.USA
    11,081.180
    -123.910
    -1.1%
  • TLT.USA
    2.900
    0.000
    0%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.520
    0.160
    6.8%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    1.860
    0.020
    1.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.310
    0.140
    12%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    2.260
    0.100
    4.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.260
    0.040
    3.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    2.730
    0.150
    5.8%
  • WAIT.USA
    103.000
    -17.000
    -14.2%
  • ITVI.USA
    11,095.550
    -126.500
    -1.1%
  • OTRI.USA
    15.880
    -0.310
    -1.9%
  • OTVI.USA
    11,081.180
    -123.910
    -1.1%
  • TLT.USA
    2.900
    0.000
    0%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.520
    0.160
    6.8%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    1.860
    0.020
    1.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.310
    0.140
    12%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    2.260
    0.100
    4.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.260
    0.040
    3.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    2.730
    0.150
    5.8%
  • WAIT.USA
    103.000
    -17.000
    -14.2%
American Shipper

Maersk Sealand prepares for Canadian 24-hour rule

Maersk Sealand prepares for Canadian 24-hour rule

   To comply with the 24-hour advance manifest rule of the Canada Customs and Revenue Agency, Maersk Sealand has notified its customers of the requirements of the rule, due to become effective April 19.

   Importers should “ensure that their overseas shippers communicate complete bill of lading information to us at least 36 hours before the vessel cargo cut-off,” Maersk Sealand said in a notice to customers.

   “Be as specific as possible with the cargo description on all documentation,” it said. “Use maersksealand.com to manage this process electronically. Do not rely on manual faxes or other more cumbersome processes.”

   Canada Customs and Revenue Agency’s new advance manifest rule, applies to all cargo — whether Canadian-bound or non-Canadian-bound — on vessels calling at Canadian ports.

   “The purpose of the new rule is to screen cargo before it is loaded so that Canada Customs can decide on its loading/no loading status in advance,” Maersk Sealand said.

   The big Danish carrier said that its internal system, which already handles the U.S. Customs and Border Protection 24-hour rule, is being redesigned to handle these changes for Canada Customs.

   The Canadian regulations require non-vessel-operating common carriers to file cargo descriptions and house bills of lading electronically using one of several potential channels: employing an automated system; or providing full details to the ocean carrier and have them file the cargo declaration and house B/L information; using an automated NVOCC to file the information for them; or using an automated third-party filing service.

   Canada Customs will continue the current practice of sending electronic data interchange acceptance messages for manifests to carriers. Effective April 19, the Canadian agency will also send carriers, electronically, newly created “hold messages” for held shipments requiring checks.

   Further information on the Canadian regulations are available online at http://www.ccra-adrc.gc.ca (Canada Customs and Revenue Agency) and http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca (Canada Border Services Agency).

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