• ITVI.USA
    17,113.070
    186.890
    1.1%
  • OTRI.USA
    28.200
    0.000
    0%
  • OTVI.USA
    17,079.400
    184.170
    1.1%
  • TLT.USA
    3.090
    0.190
    6.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.630
    0.060
    2.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.080
    -0.090
    -2.8%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.180
    -0.060
    -4.8%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.210
    -0.070
    -2.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.630
    -0.090
    -5.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.360
    0.070
    2.1%
  • WAIT.USA
    121.000
    1.000
    0.8%
  • ITVI.USA
    17,113.070
    186.890
    1.1%
  • OTRI.USA
    28.200
    0.000
    0%
  • OTVI.USA
    17,079.400
    184.170
    1.1%
  • TLT.USA
    3.090
    0.190
    6.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.630
    0.060
    2.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.080
    -0.090
    -2.8%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.180
    -0.060
    -4.8%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.210
    -0.070
    -2.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.630
    -0.090
    -5.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.360
    0.070
    2.1%
  • WAIT.USA
    121.000
    1.000
    0.8%
InsightsNewsWeather and Critical Events

Major Hurricane Iota nearing landfall in Central America

Catastrophic flooding and wind damage likely

Hurricane Iota has rapidly intensified into a high-end Category 4 storm as of Monday morning, packing sustained winds of 155 mph. It’s heading toward parts of Central America that were devastated by Hurricane Eta, another Category 4 storm, just two weeks ago.

The latest forecast from the National Hurricane Center (NHC) has Iota making landfall near Puerto Cabezas, Nicaragua, by Monday night. There’s a chance it could get a bit stronger just prior to landfall.

The NHC emphasized that Hurricane Iota will produce “catastrophic winds, life-threatening storm surge and extreme rainfall impacts” in Central America.


SONAR Critical Events: Major Hurricane Iota, Monday, Nov. 16, 2020, 7 a.m. EST

As the storm moves inland, winds will rapidly diminish. However, extremely heavy rainfall will affect a large swath of Central America. Totals of 8 to 15 inches are likely over much of northern Nicaragua, Honduras, Guatemala, Belize, El Salvador and portions of southern Mexico, with isolated local amounts of 20 inches or more. These rains will occur over a period of two to three days, which will elevate the severity of the flooding and mudslides. Furthermore, most of the rivers in this region are still elevated from Hurricane Eta’s flooding.

Crop damage is likely in Nicaragua and Honduras as well as some adjacent countries due to severe flooding. Crop logistics will also be severely impacted.

Disruptions to transportation — air, seaport, road and rail — will be severe. Iota will seriously damage supply chains and infrastructure. Some transportation disruptions will be long-term due to washed-out bridges, roads and train tracks, in addition to what occurred two weeks ago. Recovery times in some of the hardest hit areas could take months or even years.

Click here for more FreightWaves articles by Nick Austin.

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Nick Austin, Director of Weather Analytics and Senior Meteorologist

In his nearly 20 years of weather forecasting experience, Nick worked on air at WBBJ-TV and WRCB-TV, including time spent doing weather analysis and field reporting. He received his Bachelor of Science in Meteorology from Florida State University as well as a Bachelor of Science in Management from Georgia Institute of Technology. Nick is also a member of the American Meteorological Society and National Weather Association. As a member of the weather team at WBBJ-TV in Jackson, Tennessee, Nick was nominated for a Mid-South Emmy for live coverage of a major tornado outbreak in 2008. As part of the weather team at WRCB-TV in Chattanooga, Tennessee, Nick shared the Chattanooga Times-Free Press Best of the Best award for “Best Weather Team” for eight consecutive years. Nick earned his National Weather Association Broadcasting Seal in 2005.

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