• ITVI.USA
    15,466.420
    -70.120
    -0.5%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.742
    -0.012
    -0.4%
  • OTRI.USA
    20.530
    0.040
    0.2%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,439.080
    -68.090
    -0.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    3.300
    0.000
    0%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.140
    0.190
    6.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.590
    0.150
    10.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.330
    0.020
    0.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.170
    0.020
    0.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.080
    0.130
    3.3%
  • WAIT.USA
    125.000
    -1.000
    -0.8%
  • ITVI.USA
    15,466.420
    -70.120
    -0.5%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.742
    -0.012
    -0.4%
  • OTRI.USA
    20.530
    0.040
    0.2%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,439.080
    -68.090
    -0.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    3.300
    0.000
    0%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.140
    0.190
    6.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.590
    0.150
    10.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.330
    0.020
    0.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.170
    0.020
    0.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.080
    0.130
    3.3%
  • WAIT.USA
    125.000
    -1.000
    -0.8%
American Shipper

Mexico drops antidumping duties on U.S. rice imports

Mexico drops antidumping duties on U.S. rice imports

Mexico has revoked antidumping duties on U.S. long grain white rice imports to comply with its obligations under the World Trade Organization.

   According to the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative, Mexico was the largest export market for U.S. rice in 2005.

   “This action by Mexico is a great result for U.S. rice farmers, and another example of how our trade agreements and their enforcement serve U.S. interests,” said U.S. Trade Representative Susan Schwab in a Sept. 14 statement.

   Mexico imposed antidumping duties on U.S. long grain white rice in June 2002. In addition, Mexico passed amendments to its antidumping and countervailing duty laws in December 2002.

   The United States requested a WTO dispute settlement panel in September 2003, and the panel issued its final report finding in favor of the United States on June 6, 2005. Mexico appealed the panel’s report on July 20, 2005. The WTO Appellate Body affirmed the panel’s decision Nov. 29.

   In addition to findings against the antidumping duties, the WTO also found that several provisions of Mexico’s antidumping and countervailing duty law are inconsistent with the WTO Antidumping Agreement and the WTO Agreement on Subsidies and Countervailing Measures. Mexico has until Dec. 20 to implement the WTO’s findings against the law.

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