• ITVI.USA
    15,496.720
    85.590
    0.6%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.743
    0.003
    0.1%
  • OTRI.USA
    21.110
    0.000
    0%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,466.390
    90.520
    0.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    3.300
    0.000
    0%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.140
    0.190
    6.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.590
    0.150
    10.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.330
    0.020
    0.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.170
    0.020
    0.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.080
    0.130
    3.3%
  • WAIT.USA
    125.000
    -1.000
    -0.8%
  • ITVI.USA
    15,496.720
    85.590
    0.6%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.743
    0.003
    0.1%
  • OTRI.USA
    21.110
    0.000
    0%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,466.390
    90.520
    0.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    3.300
    0.000
    0%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.140
    0.190
    6.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.590
    0.150
    10.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.330
    0.020
    0.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.170
    0.020
    0.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.080
    0.130
    3.3%
  • WAIT.USA
    125.000
    -1.000
    -0.8%
American Shipper

More Australian citrus to roll into China

More Australian citrus to roll into China

   Australia's citrus and mango exports to China are anticipated to grow after the Australian government negotiated improved market access, according to a report by the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Foreign Agricultural Service.

   The improved market access follows the acceptance of a new quarantine protocol reached with China in April 2008 for both Australian citrus and mangoes.

   Under previous citrus export conditions, Australian oranges, mandarins, lemons and grapefruit were only allowed access to northern Chinese ports and had to undergo extensive cold treatment which risked damaging the quality of the fruit.

   The revised quarantine conditions will allow more Australian citrus, including limes, tangelos and sweetie grapefruit, to access all Chinese ports and raise the required cold treatment temperature to 2.1 degrees Celsius for 21 days for eradication of any fruit flies.

   In 2008, Australia exported 855 metric tons of citrus valued at Aus $1.25 million ($984,000) to China. 'The (Australian) government says changes will allow growers more flexibility, save on shipping costs and help to protect the quality of the fresh Australian produce,' the USDA said.

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