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New Guam port master plan calls for $193 million in upgrades

New Guam port master plan calls for $193 million in upgrades

The Port Authority of Guam released a draft version of its updated master plan that details proposals for modernizing the island's commercial port.

   Commissioned by Guam's port authority last August, the master plan update was developed by New York City-based international consulting firm Parsons Brinckerhoff.

   Costs for the modernization of the port would total $193 million, including $2.5 million for a new truck gate, and $7 million apiece for the three gantry cranes recommended and $42.3 million for building new berths.

   The report calls for the commercial port to be modernized and expanded to handle a projected near doubling of TEU volume at the facility by 2015. Last year the port moved 175,000 TEUs and the report projects that by 2015 volumes will increase to 323,000 TEUs per year.

   An estimated 2,250 feet of new berths and wharves are also needed to handle the projected increases, according to the report.

   The consultant's report also calls for the purchase of three ship-to-shore gantry cranes and for the port to scrap the port's two existing gantry cranes once the three refurbished models are in place at the port. Increasing the gauge of the gantry crane rail system from 50 feet to 100 feet was also recommended.

   Following on other recommendations in the past, the report also calls for the removal of the state from day-to-day operations of the port and the hiring of a private firm to run the terminal.

   A public hearing on the final master plan, which will include the public comments now being gathered, is expected on March 5.