• ITVI.USA
    10,751.730
    -679.100
    -5.9%
  • OTLT.USA
    3.005
    -0.267
    -8.2%
  • OTRI.USA
    20.330
    0.360
    1.8%
  • OTVI.USA
    10,700.870
    -711.780
    -6.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.960
    0.380
    14.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.710
    0.160
    4.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.290
    -0.010
    -0.8%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.720
    0.010
    0.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.240
    0.100
    4.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.160
    0.060
    1.5%
  • WAIT.USA
    132.000
    -5.000
    -3.6%
  • ITVI.USA
    10,751.730
    -679.100
    -5.9%
  • OTLT.USA
    3.005
    -0.267
    -8.2%
  • OTRI.USA
    20.330
    0.360
    1.8%
  • OTVI.USA
    10,700.870
    -711.780
    -6.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.960
    0.380
    14.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.710
    0.160
    4.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.290
    -0.010
    -0.8%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.720
    0.010
    0.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.240
    0.100
    4.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.160
    0.060
    1.5%
  • WAIT.USA
    132.000
    -5.000
    -3.6%
InsightsNewsWeather and Critical Events

Prolonged stormy pattern to slam Pacific Northwest

Heavy snow, rain for next 7 to 10 days

A series of storm systems will track into the Pacific Northwest starting later Thursday and extending through all of next week.

These storms will be intense at times, with ample amounts of moisture to work with due to a constant flow of moisture from the tropical Pacific called the Pineapple Express. The storms will hit the same general areas from eastern and northern California to western portions of Oregon and Washington, as well as southwestern British Columbia, Canada.


Related: Colorado trucking company takes ‘huge hit’ from I-70 closures


The frequency and intensity of these storms will produce extremely heavy precipitation and very strong winds. Rain totals across the region will reach 5 to 10 inches in many lower elevations and valleys. Higher elevations of the Cascades and Sierra Nevada could see 1 to 3 feet of snow.

Wind gusts will hit 40 to 50 mph at times, with gusts possibly exceeding 60 mph. The strongest winds will be along the West Coast and in the mountain passes.

This long duration event will not only delay or stop freight transportation at times — road, rail and air — but it could impact general operations at intermodal hubs, oil facilities and ports. This looks to be a situation in which disruptions will be fairly localized versus widespread.

The main risks are flooding, as well as whiteout conditions and an elevated rollover risk due to strong winds. An additional concern is heavy precipitation that will fall in wildfire burn scar areas. This could lead to major mudslides and debris flows in various parts of the region.

Storms could spread inland on certain days, affecting parts of the northern Rockies in Idaho, Montana and Wyoming.

Major lanes of concern

• Interstate 5 from Sacramento, California, to Seattle.
• Interstate 80 from Reno, Nevada, to San Francisco.
• Interstate 84 from Portland, Oregon, to Boise, Idaho.
• Interstate 90 from Missoula, Montana, to Seattle.
• Trans-Canada Highway from Vancouver to Skihist Provincial Park.

Click here for more FreightWaves articles by Nick Austin.

You might also like:

Self-described ‘shaman’ arrested in California wildfire arson

Biggest tsunamis in US history

What does ‘containing a wildfire’ actually mean?

Nick Austin, Director of Weather Analytics and Senior Meteorologist

In his nearly 20 years of weather forecasting experience, Nick worked on air at WBBJ-TV and WRCB-TV, including time spent doing weather analysis and field reporting. He received his Bachelor of Science in Meteorology from Florida State University as well as a Bachelor of Science in Management from Georgia Institute of Technology. Nick is also a member of the American Meteorological Society and National Weather Association. As a member of the weather team at WBBJ-TV in Jackson, Tennessee, Nick was nominated for a Mid-South Emmy for live coverage of a major tornado outbreak in 2008. As part of the weather team at WRCB-TV in Chattanooga, Tennessee, Nick shared the Chattanooga Times-Free Press Best of the Best award for “Best Weather Team” for eight consecutive years. Nick earned his National Weather Association Broadcasting Seal in 2005.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

We are glad you’re enjoying the content

Sign up for a free FreightWaves account today for unlimited access to all of our latest content

By signing in for the first time, I give consent for FreightWaves to send me event updates and news. I can unsubscribe from these emails at any time. For more information please see our Privacy Policy.