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  • OTLT.USA
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  • OTRI.USA
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    0.1%
  • OTVI.USA
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  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
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American Shipper

Siberia-Alaska tunnel discussed

Siberia-Alaska tunnel discussed

Chunnel? Check. Seikan Tunnel? Check. Oresund Bridge? Check.

   Having connected England and France, Hokaido and Honshu, Denmark and Sweden, engineers seeking to span the world are now reviving an old dream — a tunnel beneath the Bering Strait.

   The Bloomberg news service reported this week on a briefing in Russia on a plan to build tunnel, with trains, and accompanying oil and gas pipelines and electric transmission lines between Siberia to Alaska.

   The cost? A cool $65 billion.

   Walter Hickel, former governor of Alaska, is said by Bloomberg to be going to Moscow next week to speak on a conference on the subject.

   Rival news service Reuters reported on the conference under the headline: “Russia-Alaska tunnel is far off, if not pipe dream.”

   American Shipper readers are probably more interested in whether money can be found to increase double-stack capacity between Los Angeles-Long Beach and Chicago.

   But dreamers have posited an even more far-out idea — a 3,100-mile tunnel between the United States and England through which maglev trains could travel at 5,000 mph.

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