• ITVI.USA
    15,861.160
    -7.510
    0%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.793
    0.019
    0.7%
  • OTRI.USA
    21.460
    -0.010
    0%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,867.600
    -6.080
    0%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.950
    -0.570
    -16.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.610
    0.650
    22%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.370
    -0.240
    -14.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.550
    0.210
    6.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.320
    0.220
    10.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.110
    0.250
    6.5%
  • WAIT.USA
    126.000
    0.000
    0%
  • ITVI.USA
    15,861.160
    -7.510
    0%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.793
    0.019
    0.7%
  • OTRI.USA
    21.460
    -0.010
    0%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,867.600
    -6.080
    0%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.950
    -0.570
    -16.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.610
    0.650
    22%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.370
    -0.240
    -14.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.550
    0.210
    6.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.320
    0.220
    10.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.110
    0.250
    6.5%
  • WAIT.USA
    126.000
    0.000
    0%
American ShipperShippingTrade and Compliance

Southern California ports thrive in February

The Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach both experienced a strong February for containerized cargo throughput, particularly imports, as shippers scurried to get their goods moved from Asia before Chinese New Year began Feb. 16.

   The Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach both increased container throughput in February 2018 from 12 months earlier, the Southern California ports each revealed Tuesday.
   The sharp increase can be attributed to Chinese New Year, also referred to as Lunar New Year, falling later this year. The Chinese New Year began Feb. 16 this year, compared to Jan. 28 last year.
   Shippers tend to typically move cargo ahead of the holiday, since many factories in China and other Asian nations shut down for a week or more. In addition, container carriers commonly “blank” voyages around Chinese New Year because of reduced demand for transport.
   “We expect a lull in March as East Asian nations celebrate the Lunar New Year holiday, and then a rebound in April,” Port of Long Beach Executive Director Mario Cordero said.
   In February, the Port of Los Angeles processed 725,059 TEUs, up 15.9 percent year-over-year.
   Compared to last February at the Port of Los Angeles:
     • Loaded imports increased 28.1 percent to 383,089 TEUs;
     • Loaded exports increased 1.4 percent to 157,591 TEUs;
     • And empty containers increased 7.8 percent to 184,378 TEUs.
   Meanwhile, the Port of Long Beach processed 661,790 TEUs in February, up 32.8 percent year-over-year.
   Compared to last February at the Port of Long Beach:
     • Loaded imports increased 37 percent to 342,247 TEUs;
     • Loaded exports increased 9.3 percent to 130,916 TEUs;
     • And empty containers increased 46.5 percent to 188,628 TEUs.
   Up the Pacific coast at the Port of Oakland, loaded imports reached 73,666 TEUs during the month, loaded exports stood at 73,905 TEUs and empty containers totaled 40,604 TEUs.
   The Port of Oakland is called by more container services than the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, according to BlueWater Reporting’s Port Dashboard tool, but all transpacific services calling Oakland call either Los Angeles or Long Beach first, meaning more cargo is discharged at those ports from Asia instead of Oakland.
   However, Port of Oakland CEO Chris Lytle revealed during his annual state of the port speech in January that the port is working to become the first port of call for some cargo ships traveling from Asia. “Right now, we have about 28 transpacific strings of vessels that call Oakland,” Lytle said during his speech. “All 28 make a first stop in LA or Long Beach – that’s not good for us.”

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