• ITVI.USA
    15,130.160
    96.590
    0.6%
  • OTRI.USA
    24.070
    -0.310
    -1.3%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,125.210
    107.720
    0.7%
  • TLT.USA
    2.710
    -0.010
    -0.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    3.350
    0.280
    9.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.090
    0.230
    8%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.730
    0.070
    4.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.100
    0.150
    5.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.160
    0.120
    5.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.570
    0.220
    6.6%
  • WAIT.USA
    125.000
    -2.000
    -1.6%
  • ITVI.USA
    15,130.160
    96.590
    0.6%
  • OTRI.USA
    24.070
    -0.310
    -1.3%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,125.210
    107.720
    0.7%
  • TLT.USA
    2.710
    -0.010
    -0.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    3.350
    0.280
    9.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.090
    0.230
    8%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.730
    0.070
    4.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.100
    0.150
    5.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.160
    0.120
    5.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.570
    0.220
    6.6%
  • WAIT.USA
    125.000
    -2.000
    -1.6%
InsightsNewsWeather and Critical Events

Southern severe storm outbreak threatens truckers

Tornadoes possible from Texas to Tennessee

In true March fashion, severe thunderstorms are likely to break out across the South over the next few days. Truckers will run into delays from the Plains to the Carolinas.

A low-pressure cell and associated frontal systems will begin to crank up Tuesday across the central and southern Plains. Severe thunderstorms will be scattered from Austin and Dallas, Texas, to Oklahoma City and Tulsa, Oklahoma, as well as Wichita, Kansas. Main threats are large hail and damaging winds, especially later in the day and into the night.

The systems will then track into the mid-South and lower Mississippi Valley Tuesday night and Wednesday, gaining strength along the way. As a result, a significant severe weather outbreak is forecast across this region. Drivers should be prepared for all modes of severe weather — tornadoes (possibly strong in this case), large hail and wind gusts of 60-plus mph. Torrential rainfall could stop drivers in their tracks at times, leading to spots of flash flooding and road closures.

Not all areas within the potential impact zone will experience severe weather, but this zone represents the area with elevated risk.

These storms could cause localized disruptions to transportation and supply chains. Major cities within the zone include Memphis, Tennessee; Little Rock, Arkansas; Jackson, Mississippi; Birmingham, Montgomery and Mobile, Alabama; and New Orleans.

By Wednesday night and early Thursday, the risk for severe storms moves to Atlanta; Jacksonville and Tallahassee, Florida; Chattanooga and Knoxville, Tennessee; the Carolinas; and Virginia. 

Look for weather updates throughout the week on the FreightWaves website and social media accounts.

Click here for more FreightWaves articles by Nick Austin.

Nick Austin, Director of Weather Analytics and Senior Meteorologist

In his nearly 20 years of weather forecasting experience, Nick worked on air at WBBJ-TV and WRCB-TV, including time spent doing weather analysis and field reporting. He received his Bachelor of Science in Meteorology from Florida State University as well as a Bachelor of Science in Management from Georgia Institute of Technology. Nick is also a member of the American Meteorological Society and National Weather Association. As a member of the weather team at WBBJ-TV in Jackson, Tennessee, Nick was nominated for a Mid-South Emmy for live coverage of a major tornado outbreak in 2008. As part of the weather team at WRCB-TV in Chattanooga, Tennessee, Nick shared the Chattanooga Times-Free Press Best of the Best award for “Best Weather Team” for eight consecutive years. Nick earned his National Weather Association Broadcasting Seal in 2005.

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