• ITVI.USA
    13,795.070
    81.410
    0.6%
  • OTRI.USA
    26.560
    -0.120
    -0.4%
  • OTVI.USA
    13,740.380
    64.000
    0.5%
  • TLT.USA
    2.720
    -0.060
    -2.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.670
    0.130
    5.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    2.930
    0.280
    10.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.320
    -0.020
    -1.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.040
    0.050
    1.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.740
    0.050
    3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.210
    0.000
    0%
  • WAIT.USA
    108.000
    5.000
    4.9%
  • ITVI.USA
    13,795.070
    81.410
    0.6%
  • OTRI.USA
    26.560
    -0.120
    -0.4%
  • OTVI.USA
    13,740.380
    64.000
    0.5%
  • TLT.USA
    2.720
    -0.060
    -2.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.670
    0.130
    5.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    2.930
    0.280
    10.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.320
    -0.020
    -1.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.040
    0.050
    1.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.740
    0.050
    3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.210
    0.000
    0%
  • WAIT.USA
    108.000
    5.000
    4.9%
American Shipper

States to use drones for monitoring highway systems

Automated aerial vehicles offer a faster, cheaper, and safer way to carry out bridge inspections, monitor traffic and conduct aerial surveys, according to the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials.

   The use of drones by state transportation departments could mitigate some traffic conditions, with the indirect benefit of reducing delays of shipments carried by trucks.
   According to the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, 17 state transportation departments have actively researched, tested or are using unmanned aerial vehicles to inspect bridges, assist with clearing vehicle crashes, monitor traffic flows, and survey areas susceptible to landslides, rockslides and flooding. Another 16 agencies are studying the possibility of using the technology because of potential safety and cost benefits.
   The Michigan Department of Transportation estimates that a standard bridge deck inspection takes eight hours, a crew of four people and heavy equipment, costing an estimated $4,600. The same inspection with a drone takes two people, only two hours and costs an estimated $250.
   “Our first study looked at the viability (of UAV’s) and what we found out is that the unmanned aerial vehicle provided a mechanism to keep our workers out of harm’s way,” MDOT Engineer of Operations and Maintenance Steven J. Cook said in an AASHTO news release. “A traditional bridge inspection for example typically involves setting up work zones, detouring traffic and using heavy equipment. The UAV’s can get in and get out quickly, capturing data in near real-time and causing less distraction and inconvenience to drivers.”
   All drone testing must be approved by the Federal Aviation Administration, which is in the process of developing new regulations for commercial drone testing and use.

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