• DATVF.ATLPHL
    1.706
    0.015
    0.9%
  • DATVF.CHIATL
    1.975
    0.071
    3.7%
  • DATVF.DALLAX
    0.924
    0.014
    1.5%
  • DATVF.LAXDAL
    1.546
    0.092
    6.3%
  • DATVF.SEALAX
    0.892
    0.012
    1.4%
  • DATVF.PHLCHI
    1.015
    0.041
    4.2%
  • DATVF.LAXSEA
    2.140
    -0.004
    -0.2%
  • DATVF.VEU
    1.565
    0.042
    2.8%
  • DATVF.VNU
    1.439
    0.033
    2.3%
  • DATVF.VSU
    1.235
    0.053
    4.5%
  • DATVF.VWU
    1.516
    0.004
    0.3%
  • ITVI.USA
    10,856.810
    -37.810
    -0.3%
  • OTRI.USA
    4.760
    0.080
    1.7%
  • OTVI.USA
    10,838.010
    -38.560
    -0.4%
  • TLT.USA
    2.430
    -0.060
    -2.4%
  • WAIT.USA
    150.000
    -1.000
    -0.7%
  • DATVF.ATLPHL
    1.706
    0.015
    0.9%
  • DATVF.CHIATL
    1.975
    0.071
    3.7%
  • DATVF.DALLAX
    0.924
    0.014
    1.5%
  • DATVF.LAXDAL
    1.546
    0.092
    6.3%
  • DATVF.SEALAX
    0.892
    0.012
    1.4%
  • DATVF.PHLCHI
    1.015
    0.041
    4.2%
  • DATVF.LAXSEA
    2.140
    -0.004
    -0.2%
  • DATVF.VEU
    1.565
    0.042
    2.8%
  • DATVF.VNU
    1.439
    0.033
    2.3%
  • DATVF.VSU
    1.235
    0.053
    4.5%
  • DATVF.VWU
    1.516
    0.004
    0.3%
  • ITVI.USA
    10,856.810
    -37.810
    -0.3%
  • OTRI.USA
    4.760
    0.080
    1.7%
  • OTVI.USA
    10,838.010
    -38.560
    -0.4%
  • TLT.USA
    2.430
    -0.060
    -2.4%
  • WAIT.USA
    150.000
    -1.000
    -0.7%
Weather

Storms, flood potential from Rockies to East Coast (forecast video)

In it for the long haul

SONAR Critical Events: Flash Flood Watch areas for August 22, 2019 as of 10:00 a.m. EDT.

Today, August 22, 2019 will be another unsettled afternoon and evening with thunderstorms scattered from portions of the Rockies all the way to the East Coast. Storms could pack a bit more punch in spots from the Texas Panhandle to New England – localized areas of large hail, violent winds and/or flash flooding are possible. This could slow down long-haul drivers at times on I-40 from Amarillo to Nashville, as well as tweener hauls on I-44 from Oklahoma City to St. Louis (through Joplin, a market with a recent spike in outbound freight volumes) and on I-81 from Bristol, Tennessee to Scranton, Pennsylvania. An official Flash Flood Watch remains in effect from Tulsa to St. Louis and southwestern Illinois. The I-95 corridor may be dicey in some places from Fayetteville, North Carolina to Portland, Maine.

A few severe storms could also pop up along the I-25 corridor from Denver to Cheyenne, Wyoming and Billings, Montana. However, most storms that develop should be garden variety, causing minimal delays.

Tropical update

SONAR Critical Events: Tropical Storm Ivo on Thursday, August 22, 2019 at 11:00 a.m. EDT.

Tropical Storm Ivo, pronounced EYE-vo, is spinning in the eastern Pacific, centered 550 miles from the tip of the Baja Peninsula. As of 11:00 a.m. EDT, Ivo’s maximum sustained winds were 65 mph, forecast to increase to Category 1 hurricane strength on Friday, August 23.

Ivo poses no threat to any land assets. However, freighter crews will have to steer around the storm during the next several days. So, there may be minor delays in the arrivals/departures of ocean cargo.

Have a great day, and be careful out there!

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Nick Austin, Director of Weather Analytics and Senior Meteorologist

In his 17 years of weather forecasting experience, Nick worked on air at WBBJ-TV and WRCB-TV, including time spent doing weather analysis and field reporting. He received his Bachelor of Science in Meteorology from Florida State University as well as a Bachelor of Science in Management from Georgia Institute of Technology. Nick is also a member of the American Meteorological Society and National Weather Association. As a member of the weather team at WBBJ-TV in Jackson, Tennessee, Nick was nominated for a Mid-South Emmy for live coverage of a major tornado outbreak in 2008. As part of the weather team at WRCB-TV in Chattanooga, Tennessee, Nick shared the Chattanooga Times-Free Press Best of the Best award for “Best Weather Team” for eight consecutive years. Nick earned his National Weather Association Broadcasting Seal in 2005.

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