• ITVI.USA
    16,030.520
    117.340
    0.7%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.809
    0.016
    0.6%
  • OTRI.USA
    22.220
    -0.080
    -0.4%
  • OTVI.USA
    16,016.550
    115.560
    0.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.950
    -0.570
    -16.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.610
    0.650
    22%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.370
    -0.240
    -14.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.550
    0.210
    6.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.320
    0.220
    10.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.110
    0.250
    6.5%
  • WAIT.USA
    126.000
    0.000
    0%
  • ITVI.USA
    16,030.520
    117.340
    0.7%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.809
    0.016
    0.6%
  • OTRI.USA
    22.220
    -0.080
    -0.4%
  • OTVI.USA
    16,016.550
    115.560
    0.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.950
    -0.570
    -16.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.610
    0.650
    22%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.370
    -0.240
    -14.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.550
    0.210
    6.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.320
    0.220
    10.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.110
    0.250
    6.5%
  • WAIT.USA
    126.000
    0.000
    0%
American Shipper

Super-post Panamax cranes delivered to Port of Houston

Electric ship-to-shore cranes can lift and lower a loaded container at twice the speed of cranes currently in use at the Barbours Cut Terminal.

   The Port of Houston Authority on Tuesday received four giant cranes for its Barbours Cut Terminal that can reach across the largest container vessels in service today. The cranes, which are nearly 30 stories high, were manufactured by Konecranes in Mokpo, South Korea. A special purpose shift departed with the cranes on Feb. 23 and docked near the Barbours Cut Terminal yesterday.
   The electric ship-to-shore cranes can lift and lower a loaded container at twice the speed of cranes currently in use at the terminal. They weigh 1,505 tons compared to 635 tons for the existing cranes, and are 289 feet high with a lift height of 204 feet. They can handle ships 22 containers wide.
   The cranes will not be operational until late summer because they have to be moved to the dock, set up and undergo testing.
   The Port of Houston Authority spent $50 million for the cranes to accommodate the expected increase in larger vessels once the expanded section of the Panama Canal opens for business in 2016. Many ports along the Gulf and East Coast are gearing up their infrastructure to be ready for the larger vessels, although it is expected that carriers will rationalize the number of ports they utilize for vessels above 10,000 TEUs in capacity.

We are glad you’re enjoying the content

Sign up for a free FreightWaves account today for unlimited access to all of our latest content

By signing in for the first time, I give consent for FreightWaves to send me event updates and news. I can unsubscribe from these emails at any time. For more information please see our Privacy Policy.