• DATVF.SEALAX
    1.307
    0.018
    1.4%
  • DATVF.VNU
    1.527
    0.024
    1.6%
  • DATVF.PHLCHI
    0.967
    0.014
    1.5%
  • DATVF.VWU
    1.734
    0.046
    2.7%
  • DATVF.ATLPHL
    1.723
    0.013
    0.8%
  • DATVF.LAXDAL
    1.591
    -0.014
    -0.9%
  • DATVF.DALLAX
    0.969
    0.055
    6%
  • DATVF.VSU
    1.280
    0.020
    1.6%
  • DATVF.CHIATL
    2.008
    -0.016
    -0.8%
  • DATVF.VEU
    1.566
    0.004
    0.3%
  • DATVF.LAXSEA
    2.162
    0.074
    3.5%
  • ITVI.USA
    10,355.900
    24.070
    0.2%
  • OTRI.USA
    8.250
    0.160
    2%
  • OTVI.USA
    10,373.890
    23.230
    0.2%
  • TLT.USA
    2.600
    -0.020
    -0.8%
  • WAIT.USA
    158.000
    8.000
    5.3%
  • DATVF.SEALAX
    1.307
    0.018
    1.4%
  • DATVF.VNU
    1.527
    0.024
    1.6%
  • DATVF.PHLCHI
    0.967
    0.014
    1.5%
  • DATVF.VWU
    1.734
    0.046
    2.7%
  • DATVF.ATLPHL
    1.723
    0.013
    0.8%
  • DATVF.LAXDAL
    1.591
    -0.014
    -0.9%
  • DATVF.DALLAX
    0.969
    0.055
    6%
  • DATVF.VSU
    1.280
    0.020
    1.6%
  • DATVF.CHIATL
    2.008
    -0.016
    -0.8%
  • DATVF.VEU
    1.566
    0.004
    0.3%
  • DATVF.LAXSEA
    2.162
    0.074
    3.5%
  • ITVI.USA
    10,355.900
    24.070
    0.2%
  • OTRI.USA
    8.250
    0.160
    2%
  • OTVI.USA
    10,373.890
    23.230
    0.2%
  • TLT.USA
    2.600
    -0.020
    -0.8%
  • WAIT.USA
    158.000
    8.000
    5.3%
FreightWaves LIVENews

Telling the stories of truck drivers (with video)

Rachel Premack, a rising transportation reporter at Business Insider, has become a champion among truck drivers for covering the issues from their perspective.

Despite that she is young and female, Rachel Premack, a transportation reporter with Business Insider, has nonetheless become a celebrity of sorts among the nation’s truck drivers.

In fact, many drivers across the country now look forward to her behind-the-scenes news coverage.

“In New York, people don’t realize this concept that logistics and trucking, and all these sorts of parts of the economy, are actually why we have anything” in stores to consume, Premack told attendees at an FW Live panel in Chicago on Nov. 12

Traditionally, media coverage of trucking is centered around corporations and finance. Premack is putting a face on the industry with her personality-driven approach.

Prior to joining Business Insider in early 2018, the publication had not covered the business of trucking in a substantive way, Premack said. 

Last year, she wrote a story about the impact of the ELD mandate. “There was quite a bit of traffic, quite a bit of traction for that story,” she said, adding after that she determined it was an important beat to cover. 

Premack caused a bit of controversy in the trucking industry recently when she used the word “bloodbath” in a headline explaining the impact of the collapsing spot rate market last year.

She stood by the word choice, stating that that was how the truck drivers explained the spot rate dropoff to her in terms of their business and take-home pay, despite pushback from trucking industry CEOs and analysts who try to downplay it.

“I’m writing it from the perspective of the person who is actually doing the job in the industry and they’re noticing their pay is decreasing quite a bit,” she said.

Premack prefers to approach her trucking stories from the drivers’ perspective and feels it’s important to tell their stories. “No one is really talking about them,” she said.

FreightWaves CEO Craig Fuller, who was onstage with Premack, noted that any discussion of driver shortages tends to “fire up” the drivers, because it’s more about compensation and supply versus demand. 

Premack agreed, citing that the Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics found that there’s not actually a truck driver shortage. “It’s just that drivers aren’t getting paid enough” to draw to and keep them in the industry, she said.

“If we saw the wages increase, then we would probably have less of a shortage,” she added.

However, she noted the average truck driver age is between 50 and 55 years old. “There is definitely an issue with attracting millennials to the industry,” but this could be solved in most cases by changing the salary and compensation structures, Premack said.

In the 1970s and 1980s, there were movies that portrayed the truck driver as a “folk hero,” whereas now they are viewed in “negative stereotypes.”

The appeal to the trucking driver industry today is the continued appreciation of their independence and being their own boss, Premack said.

“Any discussion that threatens their independence, threatens their freedom gets them fired up,” she said.

She has occasionally been criticized by trucking companies and the American Trucking Associations for some of her coverage, and has occasionally encountered sexist comments, but for the most part she said she has received positive feedback for her coverage by the truck driver industry.

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Chris Gillis

Located in the Washington, D.C. area, Chris Gillis primarily reports on regulatory and legislative topics that impact cross-border trade. He joined American Shipper in 1994, shortly after graduating from Mount St. Mary’s College in Emmitsburg, Md., with a degree in international business and economics.

One Comment

  1. What ? Increase driver wages ??? No , no , NO !

    We can’t have that now can we . It would increase BIG CORP. costs and have a negative effect on their bottom lines . How would they explain this to shareholders ? And what about those Executive performance bonuses ??? They certainly don’t want to jeopardize those bonuses ! No , no , NO !

    The “gout du jour” is to lobby government for immigration programs and help immigrants integrate trucking AT LOW COST to BIG CORP. .

    Yeah , that will keep costs low and shareholders happy while executives cash in BIG TIME on performance “bonuses” . And while doing that , lobby autonomous truck acceptance by ranting about a truck driver shortage “problem” which is caused by BIG CORP. low wages while lobbying for regulations to squeeze and scare the bejesus out of new entrants , but certainly don’t mention that’s the cause , mums the word , he he he .

    Complain about a lack of drivers , lobby for regulations to squeeze them and make it more difficult for drivers to integrate the trade , while lobbying for immigration programs which supply people that are easier to control and paid less in a foreign country . NOW WE’RE TALKING , YEAH !

    Yeah , that will eventually solve the truck driver COST problem , squeeze them with regulations galore and low wages , and then eventually squeeze them out(eliminate) altogether with autonomous trucks & drones …… BRILLIANT !

    Meanwhile , trucking regulations and trucking “immigration programs” are choking off truckers and using & abusing immigrant ignorance . All in the name of “safety” ! YEAH !

    Ya gotta luv truckin’ ! Yeee Haaaww !!!

    In my “humble” opinion ……………

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