• ITVI.USA
    15,746.290
    48.010
    0.3%
  • OTRI.USA
    23.890
    0.480
    2.1%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,748.000
    48.490
    0.3%
  • TLT.USA
    2.810
    0.010
    0.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    3.640
    0.250
    7.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    2.680
    -0.160
    -5.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.450
    -0.060
    -4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.300
    0.010
    0.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.020
    0.040
    2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.030
    0.130
    3.3%
  • WAIT.USA
    132.000
    7.000
    5.6%
  • ITVI.USA
    15,746.290
    48.010
    0.3%
  • OTRI.USA
    23.890
    0.480
    2.1%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,748.000
    48.490
    0.3%
  • TLT.USA
    2.810
    0.010
    0.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    3.640
    0.250
    7.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    2.680
    -0.160
    -5.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.450
    -0.060
    -4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.300
    0.010
    0.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.020
    0.040
    2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.030
    0.130
    3.3%
  • WAIT.USA
    132.000
    7.000
    5.6%
InsightsNewsWeather and Critical Events

Texas snowstorm likely this weekend

Biggest impacts from Panhandle to Dallas

A fast-moving storm system will move across Texas late this weekend, producing a band of snow from portions of eastern New Mexico into the Lone Star State. With cold air already in place, much of the precipitation will be snow. But in some places precipitation will change from rain to sleet and then snow, or remain a mixture. The most likely impact zone will be from the Panhandle to Dallas-Fort Worth and the Texas-Arkansas border.

Based on the most recent computer models Friday morning, the bulk of the impact zone will receive anywhere from 2 to 6 inches of snowfall. However, pockets of 7 to 9 inches could pile up within the core of the heaviest snow band. What makes this situation somewhat noteworthy is these are areas that don’t often see this much snow, increasing the impact of the storm.

Although truckers are not required by law to use chains in Texas, they are permitted in this situation. Look here for tips on how to make chaining up easier.

One silver lining — winds will not be a major issue with the impending storm. Whiteout conditions are unlikely, but some areas of blowing snow and reduced visibility are possible. Conditions will then improve from west to east across the zone Sunday night and Monday.

Major interstates on which drivers may run into roadblocks include I-40, I-20, I-35, I-45 and I-30. Impacts include potential delays of 12 to 24 hours. The largest cities where drivers may have issues include Amarillo, Lubbock, Abilene, Waco and Dallas-Fort Worth.

Keep in mind that the forecast could change depending on the actual track of the storm heading into Saturday. Look for updates on the FreightWaves website and social media accounts.

Other areas of snowfall

Another snowstorm will slam the Northwest mountains Friday. Some high elevations of the Cascades and northern Rockies could see up to another 12 inches of snowfall, with totals over the past week to 10 days totaling in excess of 48 inches. Look for more potential issues for truckers on I-90 and U.S. Highway 2. This is the storm that will impact Texas over the weekend.

Heavy snowfall continues Friday across the southern Appalachians, from eastern Tennessee to North Carolina and southern Virginia. This storm will fade Friday night as it moves out to sea over the Atlantic.

Click here for more FreightWaves articles by Nick Austin.

Nick Austin, Director of Weather Analytics and Senior Meteorologist

In his nearly 20 years of weather forecasting experience, Nick worked on air at WBBJ-TV and WRCB-TV, including time spent doing weather analysis and field reporting. He received his Bachelor of Science in Meteorology from Florida State University as well as a Bachelor of Science in Management from Georgia Institute of Technology. Nick is also a member of the American Meteorological Society and National Weather Association. As a member of the weather team at WBBJ-TV in Jackson, Tennessee, Nick was nominated for a Mid-South Emmy for live coverage of a major tornado outbreak in 2008. As part of the weather team at WRCB-TV in Chattanooga, Tennessee, Nick shared the Chattanooga Times-Free Press Best of the Best award for “Best Weather Team” for eight consecutive years. Nick earned his National Weather Association Broadcasting Seal in 2005.

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