• ITVI.USA
    13,924.900
    3.330
    0%
  • OTRI.USA
    22.080
    -0.170
    -0.8%
  • OTVI.USA
    13,904.220
    5.970
    0%
  • TLT.USA
    2.650
    0.000
    0%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.480
    0.060
    2.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    2.190
    0.050
    2.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.400
    0.180
    14.8%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    2.730
    0.160
    6.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.440
    0.040
    2.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    2.870
    -0.010
    -0.3%
  • WAIT.USA
    108.000
    5.000
    4.9%
  • ITVI.USA
    13,924.900
    3.330
    0%
  • OTRI.USA
    22.080
    -0.170
    -0.8%
  • OTVI.USA
    13,904.220
    5.970
    0%
  • TLT.USA
    2.650
    0.000
    0%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.480
    0.060
    2.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    2.190
    0.050
    2.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.400
    0.180
    14.8%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    2.730
    0.160
    6.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.440
    0.040
    2.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    2.870
    -0.010
    -0.3%
  • WAIT.USA
    108.000
    5.000
    4.9%
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Three die from gas leak at Port Everglades

Three die from gas leak at Port Everglades

Three longshoremen were killed Tuesday at Port Everglades when a tank of argon in the hold of a ship leaked.

   Port spokesman Ellen Kennedy said the three employees of Florida Transportation Services were overcome when they went to investigate a leak from a tank container holding the gas on a Trinity Line ship, the Madeleine.

   While argon is not intrinsically toxic — it is the third-largest component of the atmosphere after nitrogen and oxygen and comprises about 1 percent of ordinary air — it can suffocate by displacing oxygen in an enclosed space.

   The gas was being loaded for shipment to Ecuador when the accident happened at around 3:30 a.m.

   An inert gas, argon is used in many industrial applications — in welding, as a fill gas in light bulbs, in the manufacture of semiconductor crystals, and to prevent wine or pharmaceuticals from oxidizing.

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