• ITVI.USA
    13,815.580
    16.790
    0.1%
  • OTRI.USA
    21.480
    -0.180
    -0.8%
  • OTVI.USA
    13,792.000
    18.110
    0.1%
  • TLT.USA
    2.810
    0.010
    0.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.480
    -0.170
    -6.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.070
    -0.210
    -6.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.370
    -0.090
    -6.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    2.280
    -0.210
    -8.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.900
    -0.070
    -3.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    2.720
    -0.270
    -9%
  • WAIT.USA
    127.000
    0.000
    0%
  • ITVI.USA
    13,815.580
    16.790
    0.1%
  • OTRI.USA
    21.480
    -0.180
    -0.8%
  • OTVI.USA
    13,792.000
    18.110
    0.1%
  • TLT.USA
    2.810
    0.010
    0.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.480
    -0.170
    -6.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.070
    -0.210
    -6.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.370
    -0.090
    -6.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    2.280
    -0.210
    -8.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.900
    -0.070
    -3.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    2.720
    -0.270
    -9%
  • WAIT.USA
    127.000
    0.000
    0%
American Shipper

Trade group: Diplomacy over sanctions dealing with Iran

   USA*Engage, in a letter Wednesday, urged Senate lawmakers to oppose any effort to add sanction-related measures to the 2013 National Defense Authorization Act (S. 3254) legislation.
   “Regarding Iran, events in the Middle East continue to underscore the necessity for thoughtful diplomacy and continued common purpose with U.S. allies,” wrote Richard N. Sawaya, USA*Engage’s director, in the letter. “A congressional legislative ultimatum to pursue the economic collapse of Iran will hardly contribute to diplomatic success, continued allied common cause, or stated U.S. common cause with ordinary Iranians.”
   He added that the Washington-based trade group has “advocated that every attempt be made when legislating economic sanctions to minimize collateral harm to the commerce of the United States, its trading partners and allies.”
   USA*Engage also urged the Senate to reject the provision in the House version of defense authorization prohibiting contracting with any entity worldwide that has any connection to any commerce with countries listed by the United States as “state sponsors of terror.” “Were this to become law, it would entail severely counterproductive consequences for DOD’s global supply chain of U.S. companies and their foreign counterparts,” Sawaya said.