• ITVI.USA
    16,350.840
    -55.350
    -0.3%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.731
    0.025
    0.9%
  • OTRI.USA
    21.660
    -0.160
    -0.7%
  • OTVI.USA
    16,343.200
    -45.660
    -0.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    3.520
    0.380
    12.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    2.960
    -0.660
    -18.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.610
    0.250
    18.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.340
    -0.130
    -3.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.100
    -0.250
    -10.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.860
    -0.220
    -5.4%
  • WAIT.USA
    126.000
    -2.000
    -1.6%
  • ITVI.USA
    16,350.840
    -55.350
    -0.3%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.731
    0.025
    0.9%
  • OTRI.USA
    21.660
    -0.160
    -0.7%
  • OTVI.USA
    16,343.200
    -45.660
    -0.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    3.520
    0.380
    12.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    2.960
    -0.660
    -18.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.610
    0.250
    18.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.340
    -0.130
    -3.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.100
    -0.250
    -10.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.860
    -0.220
    -5.4%
  • WAIT.USA
    126.000
    -2.000
    -1.6%
American Shipper

Truck driver pleads guilty to CDL test fraud

Driver’s license applicants were supplied with fake documents and exam answers.

   Aziz Akhrorov, a commercial truck driver based in Queens, N.Y., has pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court in Brooklyn, N.Y., to conspiring to unlawfully produce commercial driver’s licenses. 
   Akhrorov, who was indicted Jan. 20, 2017, entered the plea May 10, according to the Department of Transportation Office of Inspector General.
   Between April 2014 and December 2016, Akhrorov and Taras Chabanovych, a co-conspirator in Florida, undermined the CDL testing procedures proctored by the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles, according to the indictment. Their scheme allegedly caused genuine Florida CDLs and photo IDs to be issued to New York-based applicants, who later exchanged the fraudulently obtained licenses for CDLs from the State of New York.
   Akhrorov recruited New York-based CDL applicants, usually of Russian descent, and referred them to Chabanovych, the Office of Inspector General said. For as much as $2,600 per referral, Chabanovych helped the applicants fraudulently obtain documentation that established bogus Florida residency so they could sit for the exam. He also provided sophisticated video and audio devices, which were concealed on the applicants and transmitted the CDL test to Chabanovych, offsite. Chabanovych supplied the CDL applicants, who were wearing earpieces, with the correct answers to the test.
   Chabanovych pleaded guilty on May 24, 2017, to the aforementioned indictment and is awaiting sentencing.

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