• ITVI.USA
    15,999.700
    -30.820
    -0.2%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.805
    -0.004
    -0.1%
  • OTRI.USA
    22.190
    -0.030
    -0.1%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,985.320
    -31.230
    -0.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.950
    -0.570
    -16.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.610
    0.650
    22%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.370
    -0.240
    -14.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.550
    0.210
    6.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.320
    0.220
    10.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.110
    0.250
    6.5%
  • WAIT.USA
    126.000
    0.000
    0%
  • ITVI.USA
    15,999.700
    -30.820
    -0.2%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.805
    -0.004
    -0.1%
  • OTRI.USA
    22.190
    -0.030
    -0.1%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,985.320
    -31.230
    -0.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.950
    -0.570
    -16.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.610
    0.650
    22%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.370
    -0.240
    -14.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.550
    0.210
    6.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.320
    0.220
    10.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.110
    0.250
    6.5%
  • WAIT.USA
    126.000
    0.000
    0%
American ShipperShipping

UPS can now use golf carts for deliveries in Kentucky

A new law in Kentucky will allow the Atlanta-based parcel giant to us golf carts to deliver packages throughout the state, and UPS is planning to take advantage of the potential additional capacity mainly during the winter holidays.

   United Parcel Service Inc. (UPS) can now use golf carts to deliver packages in Kentucky, thanks to a new state law allowing delivery drivers to use the vehicles on public roads, the Wall Street Journal reported.
   The Atlanta-based parcel giant plans to use retrofitted golf carts mainly during winter holidays, complementing its fleet of brown delivery trucks.
   However, union leaders say the golf carts put workers at risk, since they share the road with cars and trucks, and have also expressed opposition to the new law because UPS golf cart drivers earn less than traditional truck drivers.
   James DeWeese, a member of Teamsters Local 89, which represents UPS drivers in Kentucky, said part-time workers driving golf carts make about $15 an hour, versus a starting rate of $18.75 per hour for Kentucky drivers behind the wheel of a truck or van.
   UPS spokesperson Glenn Zaccara said the golf carts have turn signals and seat belts, and each golf cart has an emblem designating it a slow-moving vehicle, according to WSJ.
   The golf carts will be driven by part-time employees, and generally will not go faster than 15 miles per hour. In addition, they can only operate in residential areas and on public roadways that container a posted speed limit of 35 miles per hour or less.
   UPS has various unique delivery methods for specific regions, including horse-drawn carriages on Michigan’s Mackinac Island and gondolas in Venice, Italy.

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