• ITVI.USA
    13,670.690
    -217.880
    -1.6%
  • OTRI.USA
    22.060
    -0.040
    -0.2%
  • OTVI.USA
    13,638.790
    -223.800
    -1.6%
  • TLT.USA
    2.800
    0.000
    0%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.480
    -0.170
    -6.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.070
    -0.210
    -6.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.370
    -0.090
    -6.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    2.280
    -0.210
    -8.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.900
    -0.070
    -3.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    2.720
    -0.270
    -9%
  • WAIT.USA
    127.000
    0.000
    0%
  • ITVI.USA
    13,670.690
    -217.880
    -1.6%
  • OTRI.USA
    22.060
    -0.040
    -0.2%
  • OTVI.USA
    13,638.790
    -223.800
    -1.6%
  • TLT.USA
    2.800
    0.000
    0%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.480
    -0.170
    -6.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.070
    -0.210
    -6.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.370
    -0.090
    -6.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    2.280
    -0.210
    -8.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.900
    -0.070
    -3.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    2.720
    -0.270
    -9%
  • WAIT.USA
    127.000
    0.000
    0%
InsightsNewsWeather and Critical Events

Weekend snowstorm could impact truckers across New England (with forecast video)

Over the upcoming weekend, a low-pressure system could rapidly strengthen off the coast of New England, producing a potential snowstorm.

As of Thursday morning, the outlooks have the best odds for accumulating snowfall across northern Massachusetts and New York state, as well as most of Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine. Other areas in the I-95 corridor such as New York City, Hartford, Connecticut, and Boston will see either light snowfall, a snow-rain mix or only rain. However, only a slight eastward shift in the storm track would increase the chances for snowfall impacting these cities.

This potential storm is currently located over the central Plains but will move toward New England over the next couple of days. The timing of this storm looks to be Saturday afternoon through Sunday afternoon. Moderate to heavy snowfall and gusty winds will create hazardous travel for 24 to 48 hours across the region.

Exact snow totals are uncertain at this time, but widespread totals in excess of 6 inches are possible. Wind gusts could reach 30 to 50 mph during the storm and for several hours after snowfall fades, resulting in periods of whiteout conditions.

SONAR ticker: OTVI map

At this time, it looks like the snow and wind will affect mostly low-population areas and low-volume freight markets. This is evident in the FreightWaves SONAR map above which shows the Outbound Tender Volume Index. New England markets in the storm’s impact zone are shaded in white and light blue, indicating low outbound volumes of freight. Overall impacts on local and regional supply chains should be minor to moderate.

Click here for more FreightWaves articles by Nick Austin.

Nick Austin, Director of Weather Analytics and Senior Meteorologist

In his nearly 20 years of weather forecasting experience, Nick worked on air at WBBJ-TV and WRCB-TV, including time spent doing weather analysis and field reporting. He received his Bachelor of Science in Meteorology from Florida State University as well as a Bachelor of Science in Management from Georgia Institute of Technology. Nick is also a member of the American Meteorological Society and National Weather Association. As a member of the weather team at WBBJ-TV in Jackson, Tennessee, Nick was nominated for a Mid-South Emmy for live coverage of a major tornado outbreak in 2008. As part of the weather team at WRCB-TV in Chattanooga, Tennessee, Nick shared the Chattanooga Times-Free Press Best of the Best award for “Best Weather Team” for eight consecutive years. Nick earned his National Weather Association Broadcasting Seal in 2005.