• ITVI.USA
    15,707.730
    81.870
    0.5%
  • OTRI.USA
    23.490
    0.230
    1%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,707.910
    79.950
    0.5%
  • TLT.USA
    2.800
    0.010
    0.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    3.390
    -0.060
    -1.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    2.840
    -0.080
    -2.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.510
    -0.070
    -4.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.290
    0.080
    2.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.980
    -0.060
    -2.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.900
    0.100
    2.6%
  • WAIT.USA
    124.000
    -3.000
    -2.4%
  • ITVI.USA
    15,707.730
    81.870
    0.5%
  • OTRI.USA
    23.490
    0.230
    1%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,707.910
    79.950
    0.5%
  • TLT.USA
    2.800
    0.010
    0.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    3.390
    -0.060
    -1.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    2.840
    -0.080
    -2.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.510
    -0.070
    -4.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.290
    0.080
    2.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.980
    -0.060
    -2.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.900
    0.100
    2.6%
  • WAIT.USA
    124.000
    -3.000
    -2.4%
InsightsNewsWeather and Critical Events

Heat wave still scorching Western freight markets

Truckers to battle record-level triple-digit heat in some places

Unseasonable heat will continue to scorch several areas of the West.

Record highs in the 90s and above 100 degrees were tied or set at nearly a dozen official reporting stations in California, Washington, Oregon and Idaho. It could happen again Thursday and Friday in these states as well as others.

Truckers can keep cool by drinking plenty of water. Also, cover seats with a light-colored blanket to keep the vinyl/leather/pleather from becoming scorching hot while on breaks.

Washington, Idaho and Montana

Highs will range from the upper 80s to around 100 degrees Thursday, and possibly Friday, in portions of eastern Washington, northern Idaho and the northern half of Montana. This is anywhere from 15 to 30 degrees above normal for early June.

The National Weather Service (NWS) has issued a heat advisory for these areas, including Spokane and Pullman, Washington; Coeur d’Alene, Idaho; and Kalispell, Missoula, Helena, Great Falls, Havre and Glasgow, Montana.

Temperatures in Boise and the Treasure Valley of southwestern Idaho will reach 99 to 104 degrees Thursday, with an excessive heat warning in place.

Northern California

An excessive heat warning remains posted Thursday for the Sacramento Valley in northern California, as well as the surrounding foothills. Highs could soar as high as 105 degrees in places such as Shasta Dam, Redding, Red Bluff, Chico, Oroville, Marysville/Yuba City, Alder Springs and Paradise.

Farther south in the San Joaquin Valley, temperatures will hit the upper 90s to 103 degrees Thursday in Hanford, Fresno, Tulare, Porterville, Wasco, Delano, Squaw Valley and spots in between. Highs could reach 106 degrees locally in the coastal hills and lower Sierra foothills from Fresno County southward to Kern County.

Southern California and Nevada

The hottest weather out west will sizzle in the deserts of southeastern California to the Las Vegas metropolitan area, where highs in many places Thursday and Friday will be near or above 110 degrees. This also includes Palm Springs, Palm Desert and the Coachella Valley in California; Lake Havasu City and Bullhead City, Nevada; as well as far western Arizona. All of these areas are under an excessive heat warning.

Death Valley will be even hotter, with temperatures peaking around 117 degrees, which is about 10 degrees above normal for this time of year.

Utah

The heat will catch up to the Salt Lake City metropolitan area Friday and Saturday, when highs will likely crack 100 degrees. The NWS has also posted an excessive heat warning for this area.

Click here for more FreightWaves articles by Nick Austin.

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Nick Austin, Director of Weather Analytics and Senior Meteorologist

In his nearly 20 years of weather forecasting experience, Nick worked on air at WBBJ-TV and WRCB-TV, including time spent doing weather analysis and field reporting. He received his Bachelor of Science in Meteorology from Florida State University as well as a Bachelor of Science in Management from Georgia Institute of Technology. Nick is also a member of the American Meteorological Society and National Weather Association. As a member of the weather team at WBBJ-TV in Jackson, Tennessee, Nick was nominated for a Mid-South Emmy for live coverage of a major tornado outbreak in 2008. As part of the weather team at WRCB-TV in Chattanooga, Tennessee, Nick shared the Chattanooga Times-Free Press Best of the Best award for “Best Weather Team” for eight consecutive years. Nick earned his National Weather Association Broadcasting Seal in 2005.

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