• ITVI.USA
    13,795.070
    81.410
    0.6%
  • OTRI.USA
    26.560
    -0.120
    -0.4%
  • OTVI.USA
    13,740.380
    64.000
    0.5%
  • TLT.USA
    2.720
    -0.060
    -2.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.670
    0.130
    5.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    2.930
    0.280
    10.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.320
    -0.020
    -1.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.040
    0.050
    1.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.740
    0.050
    3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.210
    0.000
    0%
  • WAIT.USA
    108.000
    5.000
    4.9%
  • ITVI.USA
    13,795.070
    81.410
    0.6%
  • OTRI.USA
    26.560
    -0.120
    -0.4%
  • OTVI.USA
    13,740.380
    64.000
    0.5%
  • TLT.USA
    2.720
    -0.060
    -2.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.670
    0.130
    5.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    2.930
    0.280
    10.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.320
    -0.020
    -1.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.040
    0.050
    1.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.740
    0.050
    3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.210
    0.000
    0%
  • WAIT.USA
    108.000
    5.000
    4.9%
Air CargoNewsTruckingWeather and Critical Events

Transportation photo gallery: The Pacific Northwest wildfires

The Pacific Northwest is shrouded in smoke from dozens of wildfires burning in Oregon, Washington and California. It’s a huge economic, ecological, safety and health disaster for millions of residents. Every aspect of life is impacted, including the freight transportation sector.

On Monday, Alaska Airlines suspended operations for 24 hours between Monday and Tuesday afternoons at Portland International Airport (PDX) in Oregon, and Spokane, Washington. Visibility was terrible, less than half a mile in some areas, but that wasn’t why Alaska and its Horizon Airlines subsidiary shut down. The primary reason was concern for employee and customer safety.

“The 24-hour suspension of flights allowed us time to implement a new safety protocol that directs our employees to work a reduced number of hours outside when there’s poor air quality. … Our employees’ exposure over the course of their shifts will be limited to keep their air intake below unhealthy levels. To help keep them safe, they will have access to personal protective equipment, such as N95 masks,” the airline said on its blog.

Air quality readings in the Portland metropolitan area are rated as extremely hazardous, giving the region the dubious distinction of having the worst air pollution in the world. 

Alaska Air’s decision to curtail exposure for employees is similar to the Portland IKEA store shutting down so workers didn’t have to brave the poor air getting to work and Waste Connections canceling trash pickup in Vancouver, Washington, for three consecutive days. Meanwhile, Amazon, FedEx, UPS and U.S. Postal Service drivers are making their rounds.

Transportation and delivery companies are mostly managing through the situation with little disruption, but a couple of cargo flights at PDX were diverted, and areas in fire zones aren’t reachable for parcel delivery.  

Click here for more FreightWaves/American Shipper stories by Eric Kulisch.

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Hurricane Sally tests United Airlines’ protections for parked planes

Sections of I-10 closed as Hurricane Sally slams Gulf Coast

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Eric Kulisch, Air Cargo Editor

Eric is the Air Cargo Market Editor at FreightWaves. An award-winning business journalist with extensive experience covering the logistics sector, Eric spent nearly two years as the Washington, D.C., correspondent for Automotive News, where he focused on regulatory and policy issues surrounding autonomous vehicles, mobility, fuel economy and safety. He has won two regional Gold Medals from the American Society of Business Publication Editors for government coverage and news analysis, and was voted best for feature writing and commentary in the Trade/Newsletter category by the D.C. Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists. As associate editor at American Shipper Magazine for more than a decade, he wrote about trade, freight transportation and supply chains. Eric is based in Portland, Oregon. He can be reached for comments and tips at ekulisch@freightwaves.com

One Comment

  1. I seriously doubt that any industry profits more from the Trump administration’s loosening of environmental protections than the U.S. fossil fuel industry, which greatly contributes to global warming thus stronger hurricanes and a drier, more fire-susceptible climate. With the unprecedented U.S. Westcoast wildfires and off-the-chart poor-air advisories, I wonder how many fossil fuel industry CEOs and/or their young families may also be caught in harm’s way. Assuming the CEOs are not sufficiently foolish to believe their descendants will somehow always evade the health repercussions related to their industry’s environmentally reckless decisions, I wonder whether the profit objective of a CEO’s job-description nature is somehow irresistible to him or her? I can recall the allegorical fox stung by the instinct-abiding scorpion while ferrying it across the river, leaving both to drown.

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