• ITVI.USA
    14,959.950
    116.940
    0.8%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.933
    0.012
    0.4%
  • OTRI.USA
    19.350
    0.220
    1.2%
  • OTVI.USA
    14,926.910
    120.050
    0.8%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.910
    -0.050
    -1.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.790
    0.080
    2.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.460
    0.170
    13.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.740
    0.020
    0.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.270
    0.030
    1.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.150
    -0.010
    -0.2%
  • WAIT.USA
    131.000
    -2.000
    -1.5%
  • ITVI.USA
    14,959.950
    116.940
    0.8%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.933
    0.012
    0.4%
  • OTRI.USA
    19.350
    0.220
    1.2%
  • OTVI.USA
    14,926.910
    120.050
    0.8%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.910
    -0.050
    -1.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.790
    0.080
    2.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.460
    0.170
    13.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.740
    0.020
    0.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.270
    0.030
    1.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.150
    -0.010
    -0.2%
  • WAIT.USA
    131.000
    -2.000
    -1.5%
InsightsNewsWeather and Critical Events

Weekend snowstorm barreling toward Northwest

Blizzard conditions possible from Rockies to Plains

Truckers will face another Northwest storm as heavy snow spreads across several states this weekend.


Related: 5 states with toughest chain laws for truckers


The region has seen numerous storms this fall, leading to record rainfall and devastating flooding in northern Washington and portions of British Columbia. Flooding issues may continue as lower elevations and valleys receive more wet weather.

Friday and Saturday

Truckers will hit the most treacherous travel Friday night and Saturday in the high elevations of the Cascades and northern Rockies.

The bulk of the snow will pile up in western Montana, with 6 to 12 inches above 5,000

feet, including over Marias Pass on U.S. Highway 2. Winds could gust as high as 40 mph, reducing visibility due to blowing snow.

Parts of northeastern Montana could see up to 8 inches of snow, with lighter amounts of 2 to 5 inches in other areas of northern and eastern Montana.

The National Weather Service has issued various winter weather alerts for all of the previously mentioned places. The weather may also be rough in northern Idaho and the Washington Cascades, however the NWS didn’t have any alerts posted in these areas as of Friday morning. This could change throughout the day.

(Map: FreightWaves SONAR Critical Events and radar, Dec. 3, 2021, 8 a.m. ET. To learn more about FreightWaves SONAR, click here.)

Saturday and Sunday

Snow will head to North Dakota and the Upper Midwest from Saturday afternoon through Sunday, with winter storm watches in effect. Look for snow totals of 4 to 8 inches, mainly north of Interstate 94 from North Dakota to far northern Wisconsin. Gusty winds will produce periods of blizzard and whiteout conditions.


Related: Record fall rain slams Pacific Northwest


Major lanes of concern

• Interstate 29 from north of Fargo, North Dakota, to the U.S.-Canada border.
• Interstate 35 from Duluth to Moses Lake, Minnesota.
• Interstate 94 in Glendive, Montana.
• U.S. Highway 2 from Summit, Montana, to Ironwood, Michigan.

Click here for more FreightWaves articles by Nick Austin.

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Nick Austin, Director of Weather Analytics and Senior Meteorologist

In his 20 years of on-air experience, Nick has worked on air at WBBJ-TV and WRCB-TV forecasting weather and reporting on weather from the field. He received his Bachelor of Science in Meteorology from Florida State University, as well as a Bachelor of Science in Management from the Georgia Institute of Technology. Nick is a member of the American Meteorological Society and National Weather Association. As a member of the weather team at WBBJ-TV in Jackson, Tennessee, Nick was nominated for a Mid-South Emmy for live coverage of a major tornado outbreak in February 2008. As part of the weather team at WRCB-TV in Chattanooga, Tennessee, Nick shared the Chattanooga Times-Free Press Best of the Best award for “Best Weather Team” eight consecutive years.